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If Eve only knew how her desire for wisdom would be distorted and misused down through the centuries! We know, of course, how women have had to fight for any measure of equality in both the church and the home. But what many do not know about is the powerful religious machine that is keeping women in what is termed “biblical womanhood” and the extremes women have accepted as being “God’s design.” Read more
Tim Krueger
Sometime around 112 AD, Pliny, the governor of Bithynia (in present-day Turkey, a little east of Istanbul) wrote a letter to the Roman emperor, Trajan, asking for advice. His concern? What do with Christians. In his words, “I have never before participated in trials of Christians, so I do not know what offenses are to be punished or investigated, or to what extent.” Pliny’s letter reveals how Rome viewed Christians, but it also tells us a lot about the early church. Read more
Becky Castle Miller
Someone had to make Jesus dinner. Or at least that’s what Martha of Bethany thought, “distracted by all the preparations that had to be made” (Luke 10:40). Maybe she didn’t know Jesus could go without food for forty days or that he could feed thousands with a little bread and fish. So she needed to make him dinner, and her sister Mary wasn’t helping. Read more
Bronwen Speedie
When I was a child, a popular Australian women’s magazine had a regular section on “Great Women of History,” telling the stories of women who changed their country or the world, from Catherine the Great of Russia to scientist Marie Curie and suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst. These mini biographies helped to awaken in me a lifelong interest in the true stories of the lives of women who stepped outside of the roles society defined for them. But the lives of many of the Bible’s women are not always so easy to uncover as those from more recent history. Read more
We proclaim the message of the truth of the resurrection / In the tradition of Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James / In Luke 24 Read more
Margaret Mowczko
There is one New Testament woman whose ministry and identity have been diminished to such an extent that some do not even recognize that she was a real person. She is the woman who was a recipient of the letter we know as 2 John. In this article I take a look at the text of 2 John. I especially look at the words the letter-writer uses to identify the people he mentions Read more
It is a matter of Christian doctrine that God is neither male nor female; God is spirit. The Scriptures, however, use both male and female imagery to talk about God’s identity and activities. At the same time, it is also true that God incarnate was a Jewish male. This means Jesus used only male imagery to reveal himself to us while he was on earth, right? Wrong. Jesus inhabited a male body, but his self-presentation was not exclusively male. Read more
Sarah Rodriguez
I was sitting in an anthropology class at my Christian college listening to the musings of the professor. She had been speaking about globalization, feminism, and Christianity when she suddenly posed the controversial question, should women be allowed to be missionaries? I was shocked by her question, because until that point, I had never doubted the legitimacy of female missionaries. Read more
To understand 1 Timothy 2, we need to overcome our blindness to women. We need to see Priscilla, a wise and strong leader and teacher; Artemis, the goddess whose female-centered religion would have normalized female religious dominance; the unqualified women usurping authority and spreading false teachings; and those being deceived by those teachings. Read more
Thomas Jefferson. Napoléon Bonaparte. Ludwig van Beethoven. Jane Austin. Darwin and Dickens. Wordsworth and Whitman. Lincoln and Lee. Crazy Horse and Custer. Karl and Groucho. By now you have discerned the topic—the nineteenth century. The War of 1812. The American Civil War. The Crimean War. The Industrial Revolution. The Victorian Era. The Gilded Age. First-Wave Feminism. The list could go on indefinitely. Sacagawea. Marie Curie. Clara Barton. Adoniram and Ann Judson. Indeed, someone should write a nineteenth-century companion to Billy Joel’s rapid-fire summary of the twentieth century, “We Didn’t Start the Fire.” Read more

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