Overview
Evaluation

2.3 EXPLORE

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In a survey of Protestant pastors, Lifeway Research found that pastors drastically underestimate the number of sexual abuse victims in their congregations; a majority of them guessed in the survey that 10 percent or less might be victims.1 But, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 1 in 4 women (women make up approximately 55 percent of evangelicals) and 1 in 10 men have “experienced contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner.”2 There is no evidence suggesting those numbers are lower inside the church.

“While my church leadership team was working on dividing congregants into small groups, multiple female church leaders expressed concern about having mixed small groups that included men with a known history of abuse toward women. An extended conversation occurred. Male church leaders pushed back, treating the women’s concerns as overblown. Finally, one of the male leaders spoke up, agreeing with the women. Only then did the other male leaders concede.”

—anonymous congregant

How American Evangelicalism Has Been Weaponized Against Women

In 1995, economists discovered that 100 million females had vanished. Today, that number may be as high as 200 million according to Amartya Sen, a retired professor of economics and philosophy at Harvard. Sen received a Nobel Prize for his work, which prompted humanitarians and researchers to employ a gender-lens

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How to Be an Ally to Women in the Church

Every week, members of our small group Bible study share their “highs,” their “lows,” and how they’ve seen God this week. A couple of weeks ago, I co-led the group in a discussion on what it means to be both a Christian and a feminist. To begin, women in the

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men  have experienced contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner.2

Further Reading

Domestic Violence: What Every Pastor Needs to Know
9 Anti-Abuse Practices Your Church Needs To Adopt
Clergy Responses to Domestic Violence

The only thing wrong with Domestic Violence: What Every Pastor Needs to Know is the title. This book contains information essential to every person, not just pastors. Motivated by what he terms “the magnitude of pastoral neglect” of domestic violence,

September 11, 2017

Abuse is an abstract concept for many people, and it’s a word heavy with cultural misconceptions. When talking about abuse, I’ve learned to bridge the communication gap by defining and describing it: abuse is a pattern of coercive control based in an abuser's feeling of

August 8, 2017

Of all the social problems confronted by the church, domestic violence is surely one of the most misunderstood and mismanaged by church leaders. I still look back with deep embarrassment on the time when, as a young pastor, I was

September 16, 2014

Domestic Violence: What Every Pastor Needs to Know, Second Edition
Al Miles
According to the American Medical Association, one quarter of American women will be abused by an intimate partner at some point in their lives. Often, however, pastoral caregivers possess the same misconceptions about domestic violence as does the uninformed public.

Pastors drastically underestimate the number of sexual abuse victims in their congregations; a majority of them guessed in the survey that 10 percent or less might be victims.1

Reference

1 “Domestic and Gender-Based Violence: Pastors’ Attitudes and Actions,” LifeWay Research, 2018, http://lifewayresearch.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Domestic-Violence-Research-Report.pdf, accessed May 4, 2023.

2 “National Data on Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Violence, and Stalking (NISVS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ” https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-Fact-Sheet-2014.pdf, accessed January 22, 2024.

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2.3 EXPLORE

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