Other Publications | CBE International

You are here

Other Publications

I recently had the opportunity to interview three of CBE’s most devoted members: Alvera Mickelsen, Ginny Erickson, and Betty Clark They were crowded around a table in CBE’s office, having volunteered to organize our historical files. As a newcomer to CBE, I had expected a cordial but formal interview (perhaps even with a few awkward silences). Instead, I was surprised and delighted by their sincerity and warmth. They welcomed me into the friendly conversation of longtime companions, openly discussed their lives with me, and asked me about my own life. They displayed all the humility and grace of true disciples of Jesus Christ. Read more
In 1851 a 40 year-old mother of seven submitted a few chapters of her first novel to a small-circulation, abolitionist newspaper, hoping her work might find a sympathetic audience. Eleven years later President Abraham Lincoln greeted her, not entirely in jest: “So you are the little woman who wrote the book that started this Great War.”  The book was Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and its impact upon the American conscience was unprecedented and phenomenal. Read more
In January 1941, the Archbishop of York hosted a conference on “The Life of the Church and the Order of Society,” and over 220 people attended. About three-fourths were men—mostly bishops and other clergy. Women who were identified with organizations were “head deaconesses” or in charge of women’s schools or committees in churches and government agencies. Nine men spoke—more clergy, plus some academics and writer T.S. Eliot. And then there was the tenth speaker: “Miss Dorothy Sayers.”  Read more
Anne Boleyn was twenty-six years old when she became Queen of England. She was twenty-nine when she was executed for treason against the King…. Anne was educated in France from the age of six. Her seven years in the royal courts of Burgundy, Flanders, Amboise (and Cloux, where Leonardo da Vinci served the French king), and Paris gave her a delight in the French language; an extremely cosmopolitan exposure to Renaissance classicism and also fashion — for it is proven beyond a doubt that she forever after loved fine clothes and jewelry; and a strong, living link to a heritage she had in common with most of her sisters in the English Reformation. This heritage was the French connection, a Reforming tendency which existed at the highest level of the French nobility….  Read more
Christian women through the centuries have been inspired by the lives of other believing women. In the small villages of medieval Europe and Britain, they might have held close to their hearts the witness of mothers, grandmothers, or holy women in their own communities. They may have heard tales of women saints whose lives inspired them with their virtues and sacrifice.  Read more