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Tim Krueger
When image is paramount, vulnerability becomes the enemy. It threatens to shatter that image, exposing the person underneath. Nobody says “vulnerability makes the man.” Until now. Nate Pyle’s new book, Man Enough: How Jesus Redefines Manhood calls Christian men to disregard elusive cultural ideals of masculinity in favor of Jesus-like vulnerability, love, and relationship. Read more
I picked up Amy Davis Abdallah’s The Book of Womanhood with some trepidation. Despite being female, I’ve never really identified with the term “womanhood.” I have a distinct lack of what are generally considered feminine attributes... So while I was interested in hearing what the book had to say, I was pretty certain I was not going to enjoy it. I loved it. Read more
Ursula King’s reader, Feminist Theology from the Third World brings together the diverse perspectives of women engaging in feminist theology, giving recognition and honor to the often absent or underrepresented voices of women of the Third World and women of color in the Unites States. The title highlights the book’s two controversial and misunderstood topics—the Third World and feminist theology.  Read more
Not Marked is recommended without reservation to Christian men and women who want to discover that help and healing are available to those who feel forever stained by the shame of sexual abuse and assault.  Read more
I highly recommend this book to those that are entering the missionary field, men and women alike. It is also a perfect source of inspiration and encouragement for those weighed down by the challenges life brings. Hearts of Fire will lead the reader into a space of gratitude that will cause a shift in the core of their humanity. These stories will renew in readers a reverent love for Christ and truly set their hearts on fire. Read more
Global leadership studies is still an emerging field, but Women As Global Leaders outlines the gaps in current research and points us in a clear direction for future study and consideration. While not overtly religious, this resource is a challenge to CBE readers to take equality to the next level and to consider what true leadership can look like, regardless of gender, on the international stage. Read more
Hardin Freeman helps readers think critically through the cultural and contextual applications of each woman in the Bible, interacting with readers on an individual level through the text. Bible Women: All Their Words and Why They Matter brings each Bible woman’s experience out of the shadows into the light and into our own contemporary life experiences. Hardin Freeman’s resource declares the life stories of female Bible characters relevant and worthy of the same honor as the stories of their male counterparts. Read more
James now turns her focus on men for the first time in her latest book, Malestrom: Manhood Swept into the Currents of a Changing World. Manhood, she claims, is under siege and not because there are women in the board room and men in the laundry room. The crisis that threatens men has ancient roots according to James, and the only real solution is to recapture the even more ancient imago dei we find revealed in those first two chapters of Genesis. Read more
Our own study of scripture often leads to more questions than answers, and Wright asserts, “some of the most important questions in life need to be approached from several angles at once” (xi). While the chapter on women may not be a “new angle” to some CBE supporters, it will certainly be new to many. Wright’s book serves as a vital conversation partner for dialogue and provides an original and biblical perspective for some current issues, including women’s ordination. Read more
A wide spectrum of thoughtful Bible students could benefit from The CEB Study Bible. This text provides the reader with ample study notes, cross-references, maps, introductory essays to each biblical book, and a concordance. One of the primary goals of this translation was achieving a balance between accurate renditions of the ancient original texts and clear expression to the target audience. The result is a readable version utilizing contemporary English. The translators also sought to “use gender-inclusive or neutral syntax for translating pronouns that refer to humans, unless context requires otherwise” (xxi).  Read more

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