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Wayne Grudem says that for twenty-five years he has believed that how the Trinity is understood “may well turn out to be the most decisive factor in finally deciding” the bitter debate between evangelicals about the status and ministry of women. This is encouraging to hear, because Grudem and many of his fellow complementarians have got the doctrine of the Trinity completely wrong . . . The creeds, the confessions, and virtually all the great theologians of the past and present reject completely any hierarchical ordering in divine life. Read more
Wm. Paul Young, author of The Shack, builds another rich and imaginative space in Eve that questions our conceptions of God, of ourselves, and of the beginning. The novel parallels the rebirth and healing of Lilly from past traumas, with Mother Eve as her guide, and the first birth of creation in Genesis. Through these two stories, Young challenges the reader to let go of preconceived notions, pat answers, and stale imagery of “in the beginning . . . ” Read more
If you want to expand your knowledge on the subject of violence against women, Scars Across Humanity: Understanding and Overcoming Violence Against Women by Elaine Storkey is a must-read. It is an engaging, investigative book packed with history, research, stories, outcomes, and possible solutions to the global issue of violence against women. It covers the past, present, and future of this violence that has many faces in all societies across the globe. Read more
Forbes and Harrower’s Raised from Obscurity: A Narratival and Theological Study of the Characterization of Women in Luke‐Acts is an insightful and purposeful work that allows their readers to understand the story of women in Luke and Acts as never before. They give life to the women as they seek to express insight based on the women’s experiences and actions, drawing out narratival and theological propositions. Read more
In a lively and engaging manner, this book tells the story of Catharina von Bora, the woman who married Martin Luther. The author utilizes contextual evidence, imagination, and primary and secondary sources to create an emotionally gripping narrative related to a key figure of the Protestant Reformation. Unfortunately, the book does not systematically or thoroughly address issues of interest to egalitarian readers Read more
Leanne Dzubinski
In a time when men like Billy Sunday and Dwight Moody were gaining national recognition, significant numbers of women were also making major contributions to American evangelical faith—yet without the same levels of fame. This book fills in some of those missing pieces . . . Pope-Levison uncovers the story of traveling women evangelists who tirelessly shared the message of salvation.  Read more
Shaun Brown
The media has in recent years given increasing attention to global violence toward women and girls . . . In light of these occurrences, Gerhardt’s The Cross and Gendercide is a timely work. Gerhardt confronts domestic violence, rape, gender-selective abortions, female genital mutilation, sex trafficking, early marriage, disfigurement, and other acts of violence toward women and girls around the globe.  Read more
In his book, Dignity and Destiny: Humanity in the Image of God, bioethicist John F. Kilner sketches the theological history of the image of God, critiques prominent viewpoints from this sketch, and offers a robust formulation of what it means to be in God’s image. Since the understanding of this theological doctrine has both dignified and vilified certain human beings, Kilner astutely asserts the importance of explicating this doctrine well. All human persons, regardless of sex, ethnicity, class, ability, etc., must be valued, and this book gives the theological underpinning for the imperative nature of this valuation. Read more
Vicki Scheib
I am in a unique position. I am a woman who leads a men’s group. After years of leading an identity formation group for women, I was asked to create a similar process for men. While developing the curriculum, I was hard-pressed to find material that was not complementarian, or that did not rely heavily on archetypal models to frame a man’s identity. Because I wanted the curriculum to be rooted in the biblical story and the imago Dei, I searched for resources that provided a biblical framework for a male identity. I never quite found what I was looking for—until Malestrom. Read more
Stan Goff’s Borderline: Reflections on War, Sex, and the Church offers a fresh, if controversial perspective on the relationship between the church, war, and patriarchy. Goff’s central argument is that war loving and women hating are ultimately two sides of the same coin, driven by the same fears that allow for the rationalization of conquest and colonization. Read more

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