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Fred Everson
In Mentor for Life, Natasha Sistrunk Robinson gives us a fresh challenge to develop committed followers of Jesus through mentoring. I found her model and exhortation fresh for its small group approach (in contrast to one-to-one) and for its balance between recommending structure or content and encouraging adaptability as mentors get to know their mentees. The book provides a solid framework rather than a prescriptive “ how-to” manual—or maybe it is inviting because the ample “ how-to” is situated among reminders that God’s gracious work is primary. Read more
D'Esta Love’s compendium is not only a historic record of change in the Churches of Christ, it also preserves the words of the women themselves . . . Because opportunities for women to preach in conservative churches remain infrequent, Love has collected these sermons as a way to “document that history as well as preserve their words” (25) . . .  Love’s legacy is empowering women to tell their stories in a way that connects them to God’s greater story. Read more
I picked up Amy Davis Abdallah’s The Book of Womanhood with some trepidation. Despite being female, I’ve never really identified with the term “womanhood.” I have a distinct lack of what are generally considered feminine attributes... So while I was interested in hearing what the book had to say, I was pretty certain I was not going to enjoy it. I loved it. Read more
Human beings are not computers and we make up our minds about issues like gender on a variety of grounds in a variety of ways. This lecture outlines some fundamental issues we must not forget about how people think, and concludes with some practical suggestions about how we should, and shouldn't, argue for biblical equality. Read more
“Having a woman in church leadership is just not biblical.” To say I was shocked would be an understatement; my jaw may have actually dropped. These words were addressed to our church board (half of which are female) from a long-time member of our congregation. I could have understood if it was a newcomer, but this man and his family had been attending our church for over five years. How did he miss it? And maybe even more important, how did I, the lead pastor, miss it? Read more
I was twenty years old when God called me to pastoral ministry. At the time I was a theatre major hoping to build a career as a stage actress. My backup plan was stage management, not ministry. Though raised by supportive parents, I grew up in a denomination that had a very narrow view of women’s roles in the church and the world. I saw few women leading in any capacity at church and had never seen a female pastor in action. So when God called me, there were moments of panic and weeks of bafflement when I asked, “Who am I to do this work?” I had enough trust in God to say yes to ministry but it took several years, two theological degrees, successful ministry experience, and tons of affirmation before I could say yes to myself as a pastor and leader in the church. Read more
When two of Jesus’ disciples suggested they should be given places of honor with him,  Jesus presented a different model for living. It is one of servanthood and submission to God. Not of seeking after positions of power, not exercising authority, but of becoming a slave for the gospel. Read more
Veteran US preacher Iverna Tompkins, well known for her tongue-in-cheek humor, once famously said: “For a woman to be accepted as a preacher and church leader, she has to be twice as good as a man. Fortunately, that isn’t difficult.” Read more
I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but white, American, evangelical spaces can be tough for women of color to navigate successfully. The very presence of women of color often lays bare how far these spaces (which are generally not created with us in mind) are from modeling the true—diverse—body of Christ. Much is asked of women of color in these spaces: we are asked to be patient and forgiving, gentle and gracious, long-suffering and kind, present and trusting. But we are all responsible for creating change, so I’d like to shift the conversation a bit and discuss how dominant culture might support the women of color in their midst. Read more
Unhappy that women have eclipsed men in some spheres, a man once lamented that he had been put in the “backseat” behind women. A quick-witted person responded, “Well, men have been telling women for years it’s a very good place to be!” Not surprisingly, this man was uncomfortable when he felt his God-given gifts and agency took a backseat to those of women. Ironically, his disappointment and humiliation have been the experience of women for centuries! Perhaps one day he will also express empathy and regret for this historic marginalization of women, which he himself abhors, but of which he too is complicit. Read more

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