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The CSB makes some improvements over its ancestor, the HCSB (and over the English Standard Version as well), in its translation of gender language. In contrast, the various texts which tend to form and bolster a person’s view of women in Christian leadership tend strongly toward complementarian views. Evangelical egalitarians will thus continue to prefer translations such as the NRSV, NLT, TNIV, NIV 2011, and CEB.   Read more
There is no question that sexism and patriarchy play a role in interpreting the Bible, but few scholars are willing to admit that they are guilty of such practice. In this lecture, Dr. Hübner outlines vivid examples of when biblical exegesis goes south because of an agenda to discriminate against women and maintain male dominance.  Read more
A common criticism is that gender-accurate Bible translation tactics, such as using "brothers and sisters" instead of "brothers," moves English Bibles away from the teaching, intent, and tone of the biblical authors. This workshop demonstrates that the opposite is true. Read more
Ben Witherington III
We in the West live in a world of radical individualism, even narcissistic, self-centered individualism. People tout books by Ayn Rand on "The Virtues of Selfishness." The biblical world prioritized collective or group identity. Group identity was primary; individual identity was secondary. Many misread the New Testament through the lens of late Western individualism, and one of the groups that has most suffered from this sort of misreading is women. This workshop considers the real nature of Greco-Roman and early Jewish culture, and asks and answers how this should change the way we read various passages in the New Testament related to women and their roles. Read more
Aloo Mojola
The workshop reflects on and discusses the complex role of Bible translation in the dissemination of the good news of our salvation and liberation, and in championing gender equality. We will examine gender equality as a human dignity issue in our cultures, home, families, and churches!  Read more
Joy Moore
The only “oops” in the creation narrative has become a way of life as Christian communities are structured with gender-based limitations. This seminar rehearses the narratives of Christian Scripture with its theological impact for challenging the practices of gender bias that have subverted the Christian imagination.  Read more
A summary of six groundbreaking discoveries from Dr. Philip B. Payne's New Testament Studies 63 (October, 2017) article about the oldest Bible in Greek, Codex Vaticanus, and their implications for the reliability of the transmission of the Greek New Testament and for the equal standing of man and woman Read more
Without question, women are more prominent in Luke’s writings than in any of the other three Gospel writers. The interpretation of their presence, however, is contested. In recent years, significant attention has been given to the role the women play in the narratives of Luke and Acts. The silence of their voices after the first few chapters of Luke makes one commentator label it, “an extremely dangerous text, perhaps the most dangerous in the Bible.” Can we read Luke as promoting the participation of women in the newly inaugurated Christian community? Or are women present but, after the Gospel prologue, relegated increasingly to silent supportive roles through the rest of Luke’s Gospel and Acts? While Mary sings solo, must Priscilla and others be drowned out by a male choir? Read more
In summation, Westfall’s book does not offer the church merely an egalitarian reading of a few isolated texts. Instead, she paints a broad and coherent mosaic that will force complementarians to grapple not only with her judicious exegesis of the relevant texts, but also with the reality that the totality of Paul’s theology supports women in ministry. Paul, as Westfall has amply established, is more than the sum of a few verses; indeed, Paul is the apostle not just to men, but also to women. Read more
Lucy Peppiatt
Gary Hoag revisits the topic of wealth in the letter of 1 Timothy, asking whether the teachings found there are consistent or inconsistent with other teachings in the NT, or whether it might be a mixture of the two. Scholars are divided on this question. Hoag’s findings rest on cross-referencing the terms in 1 Timothy with a novel, Ephesiaca by Xenophon of Ephesus. This novel was originally thought to have been written in the 2nd or 3rd century CE, but having been recently codified as an ancient Greek novel of the mid-first century CE, we now know that it was written at the same time as Paul’s ministry as portrayed by Luke in Acts. It’s a valuable source in shedding light on the social setting or Sitz im Leben of the letter, and Hoag studies in particular five passages: 1 Tim 2:9-15; 3:1-13; 6:1-2a; 6:2b-10; 6:17-19. Read more

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