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The attitude of Jesus of Nazareth towards women bearing sexual stigma was quite exceptional compared to that of his contemporaries. Behind this we can see, for instance, the radical idea of a woman being an individual capable of making independent decisions – the value of which exceeds the status of being considered the sex object and property of a man. Later church history has distorted this way of thinking, even though the notion of women in the Kingdom of God -entirety proclaimed by Jesus is challengingly equal.  Read more
How easily we swallow the myth that “boys don’t cry,” forgetting that male saints, and Jesus himself, often failed to conform to the gender stereotypes of their (or our) day. Read more
We are shaped by our stories. In fact, our stories, once in place, determine much of our behavior without regard to their accuracy or helpfulness. Once these stories are stored in our minds, they stay there largely unchallenged until we die. And here is the main point: these narratives are running (and often ruining) our lives. That is why it is crucial to get the right narratives. Read more
Tim Krueger
I was a heartbroken twenty-one-year-old. My relationship with my girlfriend was falling apart, and I was desperate to figure out what had gone wrong and how to make it better. Deliverance came in the form of a popular Christian relationship book. It taught me the principle that many evangelicals know so well: “women need love, men need respect.” Suddenly it all made sense. I could hardly contain my excitement when I shared this good news with my soon-to-be-former girlfriend. Read more
Christians around the world agree that Jesus is fully God and fully human. Jesus’ humanity makes it possible for him to liberate us from the bonds of sin. At first glance, this central tenet of our faith might seem quite unrelated to many other important concerns, such as the role of gender in the Christian community. But is this the case? Read more
This recording explores current research on gender differences in achievement motivation and draws implications from this research to the manner in which men and women find their place of service within the church. Read more
Over the past several decades, women have made strides toward equality in the secular world as well as the church. While some claim these changes have happened too quickly and mourn what they see as the loss of tradition, others believe they have been too long in coming and lament that we still have so far to go. While studying certain aspects of the debate, we—this article’s authors—began to craft a research project: Cameron posed a question while a student in Susan’s Gender Studies course, a question which has focused our attention on a related but unexplored aspect of the gender equality struggle. Here is what happened. Read more
Too Heavy A Yoke is an important and accessible resource for understanding the ways in which racism and sexism—both historical and contemporary—impacts the lives of black women. I finished the book with a much better understanding of the historical and contemporary social pressures on constructions of black womanhood. While the book is accessible to a variety of audiences, the meticulous footnotes offer interested readers a variety of further reading on all of the topics Walker-Barnes explores. In addition, Walker-Barnes’ suggestions for healing are both important and useful; this book should be required reading for anyone with an interest in caring for black women. Read more
A couple of years ago, I preached on the topic of singleness at my church and during a post-sermon question-and-answer session, I was asked a rather unexpected (given the topic) and baiting question about the merits of egalitarian versus complementarian marital relationships.  Read more
In 1989, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) used the phrase “best interest(s) of the child” five times in its forty articles. Christian scholars not only question the reduction of parental guidance this phrase may inspire, but others have also pondered the difference between “best interest” and “best love” in nurturing children. Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen—a leading Christian psychologist—will examine how theological traditions have affirmed not only the autonomy, or “sovereignty,” of individuals, but also social institutions, including the family. Mary will also propose a “third way” between the extremes of cultural relativism and biological determinism in Christian families. Read more

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