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Authors Jason Eden and Naomi Eden consider, in light of the case of Naomi's 104 year-old grandmother, a well-respected leader in her church community, how age might affect debates and controversies regarding the status of men and women within contemporary Christian circles. Read more
Could it be that the complementarian notion of “biblical womanhood” (especially the claim that women’s distinct personhood makes no room for women as teachers and leaders of men) is a recent, Western perspective? Read more
A study of curricula across 15 evangelical seminaries and of material from the Evangelical Theological Society reveals an almost total absence of women's history, meaning male leaders can rise to high levels while never being exposed to the countless ways women have impacted history and theology. It also reveals a movement that is interested in women's roles, but not in women themselves. Read more
How easily we swallow the myth that “boys don’t cry,” forgetting that male saints, and Jesus himself, often failed to conform to the gender stereotypes of their (or our) day. Read more
And the Spirit Moved Them was written to demonstrate that the true origin of the modern American women’s rights movement was not the Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention of 1848, but the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women held in New York City in 1837. Author Helen LaKelly Hunt gives a fascinating historical account of these early abolitionist suffragists, whose power as reformers and social justice advocates arose through the convergence of various key personalities and events, a common Christian faith and commitment to social justice, and the willingness to join with men who shared their beliefs and core values, to confront and challenge entrenched racial and sexual domination.  Read more
Scholars and informed Christians alike are well aware of Clement of Rome, Saint Augustine, and other “church fathers.” But what about those “church mothers” who likewise contributed to the growth and development of early Christianity? Women, such as Thecla, Perpetua, and Helena Augusta supported monastic communities with financial gifts, engaged in theological discourse and study, and inspired generations of believers with their examples of piety and devotion. Yet, before now, these important women have received relatively little attention from theologians and historians. Fortunately, the authors of this superbly researched study have helped readers better appreciate the importance of notable ancient Christian women, particularly in terms of the ways they shaped Christian belief and practice in the Late Roman Empire. Read more
Ben Witherington III
We in the West live in a world of radical individualism, even narcissistic, self-centered individualism. People tout books by Ayn Rand on "The Virtues of Selfishness." The biblical world prioritized collective or group identity. Group identity was primary; individual identity was secondary. Many misread the New Testament through the lens of late Western individualism, and one of the groups that has most suffered from this sort of misreading is women. This workshop considers the real nature of Greco-Roman and early Jewish culture, and asks and answers how this should change the way we read various passages in the New Testament related to women and their roles. Read more
Throughout history, the apostle Paul has been the most frequently cited authority for restricting women from shared leadership not only in ministry but also in marriage and the world. Sadly, those who cite Paul as an opponent of women's equality overlook the many examples of women leaders building the church beside the apostle, in addition to his theological emphasis on newness of life in Christ. This workshop will show how 1 Timothy 2:11-15 and 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 are eddies off the stream of Paul’s egalitarian teachings and practices. Read more
Ben Witherington III
This lecture examines all the major passages that address women and their roles in the church and in society. Attention is given to the social and rhetorical context of each passage, the exegetical particulars, and the implications for ministry today.  Read more

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