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LeAnn Van Cleef-Trimmer
In Threads of Wisdom, Caroline Mendez responds to a vacuum that exists for Christian women in business. There is little opportunity for them to engage with other Christian businesswomen about how to use their God-given abilities in the workplace while at the same time giving expression to their faith. Read more
Jennay Smith
The November 2016 presidential election of Donald Trump marked a turning point in the landscape of American evangelicalism. This highly contentious candidate yielded polarized reactions: while 81% of white evangelicals vocally supported Trump, droves of other American evangelicals recoiled in disgust. In the midst of this seemingly black-and-white reality, American evangelicalism remains a highly nuanced, varied, and diverse phenomenon. Still Evangelical?: Insiders Reconsider Political, Social, and Theological Meaning includes a collection of perspectives which mirror this varied movement. Edited by Mark Labberton, president of Fuller Theological Seminary, Still Evangelical? contains chapters by ten individuals who consider themselves evangelicals, and their reflections as they wrestle with the meaning of and their association with evangelicalism, especially in light of the 2016 election. Read more
Anatomy of a Schism is unlike any other book about a church split. Most narratives of a split revolve around a theological or moral interpretation that becomes so difficult to walk together in that the only logical conclusion is to walk apart. What’s often lost in these narratives is the individual stories of people who experienced and dialoged about the schism as it was happening. In many instances, we can watch a news segment about a church split which may give an overview of what happened and inform the viewer that the once unified congregation will now be meeting in part at the park district and in part at the library. Rarely, do you hear the news anchor inform their audience about how the schism affected nine year-old Susan or ten year-old Jack.   Read more
In her book, Worthy: Finding Yourself in a World Expecting Someone Else, Melanie Springer Mock critiques the Christian culture which labels people and puts them into boxes. She then affirms God’s heart for every individual by emphasizing how much he loves them, regardless of what the world might think. She shares many experiences from her own life, both painful and positive, that helped challenge her thinking.   Read more
Linda Putnam
Mystics and Misfits contains encouragement to lean deeper into relationship with God, going beyond intellectual assent and rational belief, into profound transformation by his love.   Read more
The terms “page turner” and “doctrine of the Trinity” would not often be found in the same sentence, but they are appropriate in the case of Kevin Giles’s most recent book on the issue. I found this five-chapter account of a recent theological dispute absolutely riveting, even though I already knew how it would end! It is an extraordinary story, told by a major player in the drama. Read more
Cynthia Mitchell
At a time when our society is deeply divided along many cultural lines, it is refreshing to find a book that is written with altruism. While Mary Detweiler clearly advocates for gender equality within the Christian church, she does so with charity and thoughtfulness. The writing is clear and concise and grace filled—as becomes a disciple of Christ. Additionally, Detweiler has written a book that introduces the primary issues facing egalitarians in an easy to understand way. Read more
The Beguines were a Christian ministry originating among the women of the laity outside of those who took monastic vows and entered convents. The “Beguines” gained their identity from a Belgic root-word—beg—meaning to mumble or to speak without clarity. This term was used disparagingly by highly privileged men who were jealous of women who were able to live independently economically and hold positions of privilege. The Beguines represented a broad spectrum of women of differing backgrounds who gave their lives and means to help the destitute, the ill, the downtrodden, and the homeless. Laura Swan’s history of the Beguines is the first good complete treatment of the Beguines that this reviewer has ever seen. Read more
Pat Kissell
This 120-page book is one of the most powerful books on empowering women for ministry I have ever read. I might even say it is the best I have ever read. Nicole Massie Martin, an ordained minister, speaks from the trenches. The content is honest, down to earth, truthful, convicting, and painful. Her observations are so accurate and timely, that throughout the book I found myself thinking, “She sure knows what she is talking about.”  Read more
Every time discouragement sets in because of the slow progress of egalitarian ideas, we ought to be able to reach over our shoulders and pull from the shelf a book such as Sapinsley's. The story of Mrs. Packard (1816-1897), set in the American midwest, should remind all of us how much has been accomplished by our forebears. Read more

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