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Authors Jason Eden and Naomi Eden consider, in light of the case of Naomi's 104 year-old grandmother, a well-respected leader in her church community, how age might affect debates and controversies regarding the status of men and women within contemporary Christian circles. Read more
Ideas have consequences. In the ”Real men” workshop, we shall be discussing the lies men believe, their challenges and their role in promoting egalitarianism.  Read more
As I watch my daughter mature and develop a rather alarming perceptiveness, I wonder when she will start to notice the vocational gender disparity around her, particularly in the church. Her wide-eyed five-year-old self knows nothing of a world in which her gender has something to say about how she can embody the gifts and graces given to her by God. Even as she watches her mom ascend the platform each week to preach, when will she notice that most of the other preachers in our tradition are men? Will that precious gift of presumption be stripped from her hands by the incongruence between her hopes and the reality she encounters? And will she even notice when it’s gone? Read more
Mimi Haddad's forword to Paul Chilcote's The Methodist Defense of Women in Ministry. Read more
LeAnn Van Cleef-Trimmer
Becoming His Story: Inspiring Women to Lead, is a good resource for readers who may be new to the topic of women’s leadership within the church. Mary-Elsie Wolfe approaches the topic with conviction and in a manner which is readily grasped. She addresses the tension that can exist between Jesus’s example and the reality of today’s church, and she provides the reader with practical application and tools to help make this ideal a tangible reality. Read more
This latest volume in the International Leadership Association Series considers the leadership of women in multiple positions from multiple theoretical perspectives. The foreword states that the book intends to change “how we think about theorizing women’s leadership.” It proposes that a working theory will create social transformation in developing women leaders and will “restructure organizations to be more equitable and sustainable.”  Read more
When I first read the title of this book, I thought that it was not really possible . . . I did not expect to read an account of one woman’s journey to the priesthood in Kenya nor of her determination to influence change within the Anglican Church in Kenya. I almost wouldn’t call this a book. It reads more like a journal telling the stories of individuals and cultural issues on a continent that many people have not been to and the difficulties of changing cultures that do not honor women . . . If you have a heart for change, for gender equity, and for loving others as we love ourselves, this is a must-read. Read more
Sarah Rodriguez
I was sitting in an anthropology class at my Christian college listening to the musings of the professor. She had been speaking about globalization, feminism, and Christianity when she suddenly posed the controversial question, should women be allowed to be missionaries? I was shocked by her question, because until that point, I had never doubted the legitimacy of female missionaries. Read more
At last we have a historical analysis worthy of its subject— Katharine Bushnell, who began her career as a missionary doctor in China and went on to become a theologian, missionary and perhaps the most significant gender reformer of her day. Through eight page-turning chapters, Kobes Du Mez introduces Bushnell within the context of American Protestantism where she rises to a “household word” (1). Read more

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