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Tim Krueger
It is wrong that we label as “feminine” things God designed all humans to experience, then pressure boys not to be feminine. When we tell boys that a man’s exclusive “role” is to be strong, to protect, to provide, and to lead, we teach them that vulnerability is not for them. In doing so, we cripple their emotional and spiritual growth even as we give them power over their churches and families.  Read more
Countering prevalent views on masculinity requires intentional action. While there are many ways to foster connection and emotional health, there’s one tool that has worked especially for us: storytelling. Stories are accessible to everyone in a family, from very young children to their more seasoned parents. Moreover, they are more interesting than formal instruction. For kids captivated by Nintendo Switches and YouTube content, that’s mission critical. Read more
No one ever warned us that we might have a child whose response to every disappointment would be perpetually set to Defcon One. We had one laid-back, happy son, and we thought we understood what little boys needed and how they behaved. Boys, we were always told, are resilient. They don’t express themselves verbally. Not only did Jon seem to feel every slight and stumble at a magnification of ten, he had absolutely no problem letting the world know about it. It was embarrassing. Read more
Nilwona Nowlin
When pondering the nature or essence of being, we consider topics such as whether or not men and women are fundamentally different. However, in society and the church, this conversation has historically excluded women of color—particularly black women—who were often considered subhuman. Through a combination of storytelling and practical tools, participants will learn more about what it is like to be made in the image of God as a black woman in a society and Christian context that refuses to acknowledge that the imago Dei resides in her. Read more
Joy Moore
This session considers the portrayals of gender in which communicate and cultivate gender-based limitations in the modern Christian social imagination. It is a portion from a larger project on identity in the world of sound bites. This session invites you to consider how media representations continue a long history of depictions that communicate a particular role for women in society and speaks for the church in contrast to the biblical witness. Read more
How does gender breed violence, and what can we do to cange this? The gender caste system and men's violence have kept us in captivity for too long. Jesus re-reveals God's original intention for male-female partnership and demonstrates what it means to be fully human and truly free in the kingdom of God. Read more
Alice Guinther
Does God Make the Man? is a fascinating look at how evangelical and ecumenical men process the messages they hear about masculinity from religion and media. The authors organized focus groups and recorded hundreds of hours of conversations to see if religion is vital to developing masculine identity. They conclude that, although evangelical men may claim to learn gender roles from the Bible, the actual sources of this knowledge are media and culture.  Read more
I have read nothing quite like Elaine Storkey’s book, Scars Across Humanity. It tells the story of violence against women in today’s world. The book is very well researched and accessible; moreover, it is spine-chilling. As I sat with the book in hand after reading it I felt both pleased that someone had so powerfully told this awful story and depressed by what I had read. Read more
Often, those outside of the social justice activist community can feel overwhelmed by the concepts and terminology of justice work. Many Christians want to understand these terms and concepts so they can do justice well in their communities and in the world. In that vein, here is a short introduction to some key justice terms and concepts to help Christians think critically about what justice is and how it ought to look in action. Read more
A womanist perspective unapologetically prioritizes black women's experiences, voices, traditions, artifacts, and concerns as legitimate sources of dialogue and knowledge. A womanist perspective provides an intentional and contextual frame of reference for biblical interpretation that is relevant for black women, the black community, and/or the most marginalized in the world. Read more

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