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Fully Alive ultimately falls victim to exactly what it professes to avoid in its subtitle. It claims to move beyond stereotypes, but not only enforces them but also sets them against a pseudo-biblical backdrop which turns one particular, culturally-bound view of gender into a universalized application for all people everywhere. Read more
When I chose the theme, Character Sketches, for this issue, I was only thinking of the word “character” in its literary sense—a person in a story. But of course, the word can also sum up somene’s exemplary personality—to have character is to have noble character.  Read more
Gretchen G. Hull was instrumental in the founding of CBE. A woman with few equals, she was a gifted mathematician, pianist, author, editor, philosopher, and church leader. One of CBE’s founders, as well as a board member and early pioneering editor of Priscilla Papers, Gretchen was brilliant, gutsy, and never afraid to speak out.  Read more
Photo of Tyler Allred
There are at least two practical applications for churches today that could come out of this reading. First, while many commentators promote the idea of Euodia and Syntyche being prominent figures in the church, this interpretation could help take it further and set them up as the leaders of churches in Philippi.  Read more
In Mark 12:41–44, a woman shows the readers the way to follow Christ as she foreshadows the suffering that lies ahead for Messiah and for the disciples by giving her “whole life” to God. Thus, she should not be overlooked in the Bible’s long list of exemplary women. Through Mark’s artful storytelling, this unnamed woman—whom Jesus witnesses giving an offering in the temple—encapsulates the self-giving life of Christ and foreshadows the lives of all Christians who follow Jesus well. Read more
Photo of Elizabeth Willett
If we translate consistently key terms such as “prophet,” maintain female metaphors such as Daughter Zion and Woman Wisdom, and indicate the gender of feminine actors who exercise various gifts, readers and listeners will gain a grander understanding of how God worked through women and girls in biblical times, and how he wants to work through all his people today. Read more
Photo of Josiah Callaghan
Like many other biblical texts, Gen 17:15–16 invades our worldview and reminds us that God sought out covenant partners—both male and female—to bring blessings to all the nations. The promises for Sarah are promises that extend to all nations and to every woman grafted into the God’s missional purposes. Read more
Photo of Julie Walsh
The promise of Gen 3:15, is a “seed—a small promise that will eventually grow into the full-blown tree of God’s good news, the storyline of Scripture.” This promise—the greatest promise of all, known for centuries as the protoevangelium (“first gospel,” meaning “first [glimpse of the] gospel”)—runs through the OT as a beacon of hope. Read more
Vindicating the Vixens is an important collection that takes a major step toward the goal expressed in its title. Its several essays vary in style, including a wide spectrum from academic to sermonic. The volume does not set out to defend evangelical egalitarian doctrine. Rather it illuminates certain biblical women and their stories, especially those women who have been misrepresented—“sexualized, vilified and/or marginalized”—over the centuries. Read more
The book lives up to its subtitle, A Provocative Guide. . . . Though it has some value, I do not recommend it without reservation, given her methods of interpretation noted above. Read more

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