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American women experience equality in a much different way than the women who are coming to us from other countries. This workshop compares the American woman's experience of equality to the experience of displaced women such as refugees, immigrants, and victims of trafficking, and shows how we can advocate for them even as we work toward our own equality.
1 Timothy 2 is often taken for granted as “the” text that clearly bars women from holding positions of leadership in the church. The debate at large is too frequently reduced to the meaning of terms such as “authority” and “teaching,” as well as the grammatical relationship between them. Although these are an important part of the larger discussion, in this workshop Allison Quient proposes another angle. Using a theological interpretative approach, she provides evidence of a typological relationship between Eve and Christ and discusses some of the implications for our understanding of human power and identity.
Faith-rooted organizing draws from the roots of our traditions to help faith communities engage larger movements for justice in our world. In this workshop, Lisa Sharon Harper equips listeners to engage the issues at play in their towns and cities by examining the response of Nehemiah to his colonized context.
Does your inner critic tell you that you are not good enough or smart enough to succeed?  If so, you might feel anything but "Created to Thrive". This presentation explores the purpose of the inner critic, where it originates, and how to overcome its power in your life and ministry
As we pursue the goal of a thriving church where women and men serve on equal footing, it will be crucial for men to advocate for women as allies. If only this were easy to do! Using a fresh research model, this seminar will outline key steps that men can take in order to become champions for women in their contexts, with the goal of developing more men into more effective advocates. This seminar is open to both women and men.
In this workshop Dr. Jeanne Porter King outlines the benefits of having women in key areas of leadership in and out of the church. Dr. Porter King provides a model of inclusive leadership and strategies that helps equip women to be advocates for themselves and each other, and tools for men to be advocates for women.
Raising kids in the church culture can be hard. Sometimes, the roles assigned to mom and dad are too rigid and narrow. This workshop explores how parenting to one’s strengths and growing one’s weaknesses can contribute to growing kids.
Why are Christians who seek racial justice not standing with Christians seeking equality for women? Why do gender equity Christians often find themselves working in largely white circles? Why are progressive Christians locked in near perpetual disharmony with conservative believers? The hard news is that becoming Christian does not make us immune to bias and the tendency toward what for over two decades Ruben Rivera has called "the cultural captivity of Christ." This helps explain the explosion of “Christianities” in the world and expressions that have justified racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination and oppression. This seminar introduces participants to the surprising ways that even socially conscious Christians can be hindered by unconscious cultural captivity and ingroup influences, and contrasts this with what Rivera calls "remarkable Christianity."
One of the greatest challenges in Kenya is the resurgence of negative aspects of African cultural practices that are oppressive to women. Practices like female genital mutilation, widow inheritance, bride-wealth, and polygamy were marks of identity and therefore important in society. The coming of Christian faith led to challenging most of these practices but not uprooting them. Most of the negative aspects of these practices are resurging because the Christian world-view has not taken root and Christian identity is not well defined. There is a need for interaction between the Bible and the African culture, to develop a world view informed by Scripture.
Christians are not meant to be defenders of the status quo. At our best, Christians have always been holy troublemakers, creators of divine mischief, folks who refuse to accept the world as it is and insist on building the world God dreams of. Let's talk about what it means to see our faith as a way of life, God's holy counterculture in the world.

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