Audio Resource | CBE International

You are here

Audio Resource

Throughout history, the apostle Paul has been the most frequently cited authority for restricting women from shared leadership not only in ministry but also in marriage and the world. Sadly, those who cite Paul as an opponent of women's equality overlook the many examples of women leaders building the church beside the apostle, in addition to his theological emphasis on newness of life in Christ. This workshop will show how 1 Timothy 2:11-15 and 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 are eddies off the stream of Paul’s egalitarian teachings and practices.
Ben Witherington III
We in the West live in a world of radical individualism, even narcissistic, self-centered individualism. People tout books by Ayn Rand on "The Virtues of Selfishness." The biblical world prioritized collective or group identity. Group identity was primary; individual identity was secondary. Many misread the New Testament through the lens of late Western individualism, and one of the groups that has most suffered from this sort of misreading is women. This workshop considers the real nature of Greco-Roman and early Jewish culture, and asks and answers how this should change the way we read various passages in the New Testament related to women and their roles.
The history of women's involvement in missions is significant. A woman was the first evangelist to proclaim the risen Christ. A woman was the first European convert to Christianity. Women have outnumbered men 2:1 in Protestant missions history. Often their stories are not told, and this recording will highlight certain people and themes and trace some narrative threads between them.
This recording examines how early church leaders viewed women. It begins with Jesus Christ, moves to Paul, and highlights how various early church leaders’ insights into Paul’s teachings are helpful in guiding us to understand those statements as Paul intended them, namely as affirmations of women and their leadership roles in the church. Some church leaders did this in spite of reflecting elsewhere the demeaning attitudes toward women common in their culture. This illustrates a gradual shift away from the New Testament’s affirmations of the equal standing of men and women in Christ.
This session features the fascinating stories of three missionaries to Africa: Anne Marie Javouhey (a French Catholic nun, founder of the Sisters of St. Joseph), Eliza Davis George (a black woman from Texas and founder of the Elizabeth Native Interior Mission), and Maude Cary (a Kansas farm girl with a “call” to bring the gospel to Muslims in Morocco)—all facing gender discrimination and all responding in very different ways.
Kent Eaton
Seeking Justice and Loving Mercy: Gender and Equality in the Bible and our Culture
Julia Kavanaugh, an Irish Roman Catholic, was a Victorian novelist and biographer. Her book "Women of Christianity" offers the earliest survey of women’s lives in the Christian tradition. This text refutes the frequent charge of trendiness of egalitarianism, as it was written 150 years ago. It confronts male-dominated history (“great events, dazzling actions”) as pagan and transcends the “wearisome similarity” often depicted in saints’ lives. Finally, her book invites connections with contemporary feminist texts.