Women of the Bible | CBE International

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Women of the Bible

There are so many great posts around the web proclaiming biblical equality. Here are some we noticed: 5 Ways Married Men Can Act Like Adults Around Women (Single or Not), by Luke Harms (Living the Tension) It is possible to maintain eye contact without being skeezy. If you lack the self-control to do so, it’s because you sir, are a creeper. But what’s more, you have so devalued women in your own mind that they don’t exist outside of the parts of their body that you find attractive. The Many Female Followers of Jesus, by Marg Mowczko (The Junia Project) Many women were dedicated followers of Jesus during his ministry on earth.  Many of these women seem to have been independent of fathers and husbands, and some were independently wealthy.... Read more
Don’t be afraid to be big, women. That’s what I learned at a conference this weekend. Women are taught to be small. Tomorrow, pay attention to how women walk, sit and stand compared to men. You’ll notice women take smaller steps with their hands closer to their sides, cross their legs, fold their hands in their laps. Men are more likely to swing their arms when they walk, stretch out their legs, drape their arm over the seat next to them. And of course, mainstream American media portrays thin women as the ideal. We women aren’t supposed to take up space with our bodies. We’re not supposed to draw attention to ourselves in other ways, either. American girls’ achievement, particularly in math and science, starts dropping off in middle school. They... Read more
Do you recognize these girls? One hint: they are in biblical order. I approached an Egyptian princess with a bold idea. We five sisters asked Moses to allow us to inherit land. I bravely carried secret plans outside the walls of Jerusalem to help David. My enemy captor heard my suggestion to entrust his health to Israel's God. My sisters and I helped rebuild the walls of Jerusalem under enemy opposition. I felt death and then I felt the hand of Jesus. Now I have two birthdays. We were mere maids, but we questioned anyway. My "friends" called me "silly" but they soon found out the truth. I was possessed by the python until Paul made my voice my own. My three sisters and I discovered our gift of prophecy in Caesarea. Finally, well into the... Read more
At Passover we celebrate how God used Moses to deliver Israel from slavery how his staff kept them from drowning in the Red Sea We forget how when Pharaoh ordered a gendercide the midwives delivered this Hebrew baby how his mother’s reeds kept him from drowning in the Nile Who knew underwater basket-weaving was worthwhile?   “Moses” means “draw out” Prince of Egypt, he drew Israel out defying Pharaoh’s army raised the 10 commandments and led the people 40 years in the wilderness. His name came from the princess of Egypt who drew him out of the water defying Pharaoh daddy raised him up in the royal household ‘til he fled to the desert for 40 years.   Moses saw God in the bush but God was wat... Read more
I’ve grown up in the church all my life and have always heard Rebekah talked about in a negative light. Teachers and leaders have called her manipulative, deceptive, and lacking in submission to God and to her husband. Tradition has not been kind to Rebekah and I believe she is one of the most misrepresented and misunderstood women of the Bible. I hereby dedicate this post to my hero and to my mentor, Rebekah. This is my tribute to how I believe the biblical story intended her to be seen, not as a symbol of perfection but as a woman who, like King David, panted after the heart of God. She was a woman who longed to live before an Audience of One and who actually served one of the most significant roles in protecting the nation of Israel (Jacob) in its very formative stages. Here... Read more
Couched between the Jacob and Joseph narratives the story of Judah and Tamar, found in Genesis 38, is presented amidst the sordid fray of poor and destructive decision making where an unexpected heroine here arises. Somehow she manages to persevere against great odds in spite of the abusive masculine roles employed against her. Tamar is purchased by Judah as a bride for his eldest son, Er (Gen 38:6). Any woman sold into a different clan was obliged to adopt that clan’s culture, practice and religion. Furthermore, as the wife of a firstborn son, great pressure was placed upon her to fruitfully produce an heir to the line of descent. This indeed encompassed the most important function of women within such patriarchal societies. Er performs some unnamed evil in the sight of t... Read more
Where are the good female preachers? Female preachers have been prevalent throughout history and one only needs to look at the right historical resources to read about their activity.1 However, women proclaiming the Good News to God’s people can also be found in our Bibles. One such woman is Anna from the tribe of Asher. In the earliest days of Jesus’ life as a human being, God sent the prophet Anna (whose name means “God’s grace”). A devout woman having been widowed after seven years of marriage, Anna lived and served in the temple where she fasted and prayed day and night. The verb used for Anna’s service is latruo in Luke 2:37. This word is used more than 80% of the time in the New Testament to denote worship, and sometimes even prie... Read more
Some people dismiss the Bible because of its lack of attention to women. However, a close reading of the Bible reveals patterns of doublet and parallel stories that bring attention and esteem to each gender. In fact, when compared to the sacred literature of other religions, the Bible provides an astounding representation of both men and women. Let's take a look at some examples. Story doublets are accounts that appear together. They occur frequently in the New Testament. Matthew’s account places double healings together: the hemorrhaging woman and Jairus’ daughter, followed by two blind men (Matt. 9:18–31). In Mark, the Syrophoenician woman seeks healing on behalf of her daughter, and the people of Decapolis approach Jesus on behalf of a deaf and mu... Read more
In considering the early chapters of Genesis last week, we observed how human identity is inseparable from being created in God’s image as male and female. What is more, our identity—as created in God’s image—shapes our purpose. For this reason, both Adam and Eve share authority in caring for the world and each otherbecause both are created in God’s image. Yet Eve is not only created in God’s image, God also made her an ezer, or “strong help.” Adam’s aloneness—the only "not good" in Eden—is overcome only with the creation of Eve, which emphasizes her essential contribution in sharing authority and working beside Adam. Despite sin and patriarchy—consequences of the fall—women continue to l... Read more
Have you revisited Mary and Martha lately (Luke 10:38–42)? You remember their house where Martha is “over busy” making preparations for Jesus’ arrival, and Mary ignores the obvious need to help her sister, preferring to listen at the feet of Jesus. In desperation, Martha appeals to Jesus, the male authority in the house, to get her sister’s priorities in line with the cultural expectations for women. Martha appears to be reprimanded by Jesus while Mary is vindicated. Many times, this story is interpreted as presenting one sister upheld at the expense of the other, preferring women who do not complain. Mary and Martha’s story has traditionally been interpreted to honor Mary’s listening over Martha’s service. However, could the sisters have... Read more

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