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Children's ministry is important for all the obvious reasons. Children are loved by God. Children are important to the Church. They are innocent and impressionable. Their presence brightens any congregation. But for those of us committed to promoting egalitarian principles, ministry to children is important for another reason--children's ministry is adult ministry. And, of course, many children's ministers--even in complementarian churches--are women. Every children's minister spends a significant amount of time ministering to and with adults. A typical children's minister works closely with scores of parents and grandparents, teachers, and other volunteers. Comforting  A young boy's grandmother dies. The children's minister attends the funeral. Sh... Read more
Galatians 3:26-4:7 Have you ever wondered what it means to reign with Christ? Scripture tells us that those who have been purchased with Christ’s blood have also been adopted into God’s family (2 Tim. 2:10-12). As family members with Jesus, we are also heirs together with Jesus—inheriting all that God extends to the Son. Because we are heirs of God through Christ, both men and women are also said to reign with Christ. In Revelation 5:10 we learn that, through Christ, God acquired “members of every tribe and language and people and nation,” making them a “kingdom and priests to serve our God, and they will reign on the earth.” The word “reign” here means to hold dominion, influence, or sway such as a monarch's rule. To reign... Read more
If he had said so a few years ago, I would’ve smiled and nodded.  Today, however, I blinked, smiled sweetly and asked my friend to explain. Bart (not his real name) was telling me about his role as “family priest.”  I told him why I disagreed.  Now, I like Bart.  He’s a well-spoken, gregarious fifty-something with ten kids and five grand kids.  We’ve worked together on various projects and ministry events, primarily at the local Christian camp.  Bart’s an engaging, amiable guy and although I like him personally, our paths diverge on the issue of gender roles like the Rift Valley splits East Africa. “Family priest” was a case in point.  (If you’re unfamiliar with this concept, Google “family... Read more
Note from the admins: Here is a link to the first press release of the Trinity Statement, by Mark Hensch of the "Christian Post". Read more
The doctrine of Trinity has been the cause of much theological controversy over the centuries. In the 4th century, a preacher named Arius argued that Jesus was less than God the Father. In response, the council of Nicaea developed a comprehensive statement of faith upon which subsequent doctrine and theology has been measured for centuries. The Nicene Creed affirmed the divinity of Jesus and the co-equal, co-eternal nature of members in the Trinity. For centuries, Christians sang a hymn that affirmed this creed. Tantum Ergo Sacramenetum was written by St. Thomas Aquinas and was part of the communion celebration. Two verses read: “Procendenti eb utroque, 
camper sit laudation.” “Proceeding from each other, Equal may they be praised.” From e... Read more
The doctrine of the Trinity has been the cause of much theological controversy over the centuries. In the fourth century, a preacher named Arius argued that Jesus was less than God the Father. In response, the council of Nicaea developed a comprehensive statement of faith upon which subsequent doctrine and theology has been measured for centuries. The Nicene Creed affirmed the divinity of Jesus and the co-equal, co-eternal nature of members in the Trinity. For centuries, Christians sang a hymn that affirmed this creed.Tantum Ergo Sacramenetum was written by St. Thomas Aquinas and was part of the communion celebration. Two verses read: "Procendenti eb utroque,  camper sit laudation." "Proceeding from each other,  Equal may they be praised." *... Read more
I believe that it is inconsistent for one to be a strong complementarian and a Protestant at the same time. Complementarians often hold that, though women can be involved in various forms of ministry, they cannot become "ordained ministers." But consider the following simple argument: According to one of the fundamental tenets of Protestantism, the priesthood of all believers (hereafter, PAB): (1) All baptized believers are ordained by God as priests. From here the rest of the argument quickly follows: (2) Some women are baptized believers. Therefore, (3) Some women are ordained by God as priests. We might thus simply ask our complementarian friends the following: If God has ordained someone as a priest, who are we to deny her ordination?... Read more
Margaret Mowczko
In the current discussions about the roles of women in the church, there has been a great deal of attention directed toward Phoebe, Junia, and Priscilla. These three women are mentioned in the New Testament as being involved in significant Christian ministry. Much of the discussion surrounding these women concerns identifying their actual ministries, and evaluating the precedent, if any, they set for women in the church today. Euodia and Syntyche are two lesser known women who were ministers in the early church. The apostle Paul names these two women in his letter to the Philippians and, in just a few verses, he gives us a glimpse into the value and significance of their ministries. I plead with Euodia and I plead with Syntyche to be of the same mind in the Lord. Yes, and I ask you,... Read more
It's Stephen Covey, I believe, who's credited with the quote, "The important thing is to keep the main thing the main thing." Like most aphorisms, it's simple to understand, but challenging to apply. Christ is the preeminent example of pretty much every life principle, and this one is no exception. But I have to admit, for quite a while I was mystified by his summative declaration from the cross: "It is finished." Weren't there other people to heal, disciples to train, Pharisees to annoy? The answer for the evangelical is that Christ's substitutionary death on the cross was his ultimate goal and essential action. Another question, perhaps more practical, is how did he know. An answer comes from the intriguing, John 5:19, "Jesus gave... Read more
In passing, Luke mentions that Philip "had four unmarried daughters who had the gift of prophecy" (Acts 21:9, NRSV; all Scripture references in this article are from the book of Acts). Feminist scholars have pointed out, however, that women's voices remain silent throughout much of this book, so we know neither what these daughters said nor much else about them. But we know a bit about Philip, and I would like to suggest that aspects of his life might shed some light on how his daughters were nurtured in the gift of prophecy. First, we know that Philip was a man full of wisdom (6:3) and courage. When persecution broke out against the earliest followers of Jesus, the Twelve remained in Jerusalem, but he ventured into Samaria, "proclaiming the word" (8:4b). Here wa... Read more

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