Priscilla Papers | Academic Journal

The academic journal of CBE International

"Priscilla and Aquila instructed Apollos more perfectly in the way of the Lord" (Acts 18:26)

Priscilla Papers Summer 2018 Volume 32 Number 3
Imagining a Feminine God: Gendered Imagery in the Bible

"In many modern churches, only masculine language for God is deemed acceptable. This restriction is historically and, more importantly, biblically unfounded ... By having an essentially masculine view of God, we blind ourselves to other ways we may connect to God and understand God. This not only distorts our image of God, but a purely…

Priscilla Papers Summer 2018 Volume 32 Number 3
Philemon in Light of Galatians 3:28

"Although the people living in the Greco-Roman world might not have been able to imagine a world in which slavery does not exist, Paul’s churches leave the hierarchy of slavery behind as part of the world that is passing away, along with ethnic division and gender hierarchy. Paul removes the power differential from Philemon and Onesimus’s…

Priscilla Papers Summer 2018 Volume 32 Number 3
The “Weaker Sex” or a Weak Translation? Strengthening our Interpretation of 1 Peter 3:7

John C. Nugent argues that "Peter was not, in fact, affirming that women are weaker. Rather, he was asking men to lay aside their cultural advantage and to win over their unbelieving wives in the same Christlike manner that slaves, women, and the wider community were called to non-coercively welcome Gentiles into the chorus of believers who…

Priscilla Papers Summer 2018 Volume 32 Number 3
Wealthy Women in the First-Century Roman World and in the Church
In this article, Margaret Mowczko looks at the social dynamic of class, a dynamic that typically trumped gender. She also looks at what the NT says about particular women who were wealthy. Her hope is that this discussion will present a broader, more authentic view, beyond limited stereotypes, of the place and participation of certain women…
Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
Editor's Reflections | Spring 2018 (32.2)

Someone ought to count the women of the Bible. More to the point, someone ought to count them accurately. I mention this because a quick Internet search reveals significant disparity in the various numbers people give for the women in the Bible. I should not criticize, however, for several difficulties make such counting an impossible task.

Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
The Good News According to Ruth

The story of Ruth is filled with drama; there’s tragedy and triumph, loss and gain, and of course, romance. Much like a fairy tale, it is a story of true love with a happily-ever-after ending. But more than a fairy tale, this true love is inspired by the source of love, the very heart of God.

Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
Finding “The Proverbs 31 Woman”

Digging deeper into Prov 31:10–31 in context reveals it was never intended to be a how-to manual for becoming the perfect woman. In the context of Proverbs, this passage is the parting mnemonic incentivizing young men to pursue wisdom and marry wisely.

Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
Daughter Divine: Proverbs’ Woman of Wisdom

Over the past forty years, the remarkable presence of women in Prov 1–9 has drawn an equally remarkable number of studies, a gift from the rise of feminism and women in the academy. The combination of these two forces brings attention to the once invisible women in the text, figures generally overlooked or ignored as males have read and…

Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
Women Prophets in the Old Testament

This article investigates the female prophets of the OT, offering a close examination of their texts and contexts. First, the words “prophet” and “prophecy” will be defined. Then, each of the female prophets named in the OT will be discussed, with attention paid to the ways biblical writers, redactors, and commentators may have minimized their…

Priscilla Papers Spring 2018 Volume 32, Number 2
Deborah: Troublesome Woman or Woman of Valor?

Unwarranted criticisms by evangelical scholars of Deborah’s leadership in Judg 4–5 continue to devalue her work as “abnormal,” “wrong,” something done only in private or even in subservience to Barak. Some rabbinical scholars go so far as to brand her an arrogant woman who deserves God’s punishment. In contrast, this paper argues that a close…