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Paul’s words in 1 Cor 7:4 constitute Scripture’s only mention of the common Greek word for “authority” (exousia) in clear reference to husbands and wives. What does his bold statement mean in its biblical context, and what does it say about Christian mutuality in marriage and singleness today?

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Sometimes the gap between egalitarian belief and egalitarian practice can be hard to bridge. Is it really possible to have an equal marriage?

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When culture values women and men equally, these very attitudes stem the abuse of women. What is more, when dollars are invested in women’s health, education, and businesses, we not only raise women’s standard of living, but that of their families and communities.

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This article investigates the female prophets of the OT, offering a close examination of their texts and contexts, with attention paid to the ways biblical writers, redactors, and commentators may have minimized their impact.

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Putting their 14 years of co-leading to work, the Fiets provide a long and helpful litany of practical tips for joyful and sustainable ministry partnerships between spouses. 

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In Eden we glimpse the larger purposes of God for humankind. These glimpses offer the framework within which the debate about the specific roles for men and women in the Christian ministry must take place.

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That woman was taken out of man is a recognition that she stands on equal footing with him. This was a beautiful, creative act of God that communicated that man’s suitable helper, the one actually fit for him, would come from him.

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Woman is opposite to man, but not in an antagonistic, or inferior, way. Rather, she comes as the suitable one for man. Or as other translations have it, she was “fit for” man. Remember, none of the animals measured up to the ‘ezer role God had imagined for man’s great helper. It was woman and woman alone who met the role.

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Groothuis clearly defines and describes Evangelical Feminism in contrast to other forms of feminism and in distinction from "traditionalism." Two other areas treated in the book make significant contributions from my point of view. One is the historical evidence that the church has accepted in its view of the role of women from the culture, rather than constructing a truly biblical view. The second is the role that Satan plays in restricting women's use of their Spirit­given gifts in ministry to the church and to the world.

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