Welcome to CBE’s Library

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Paul’s words in 1 Cor 7:4 constitute Scripture’s only mention of the common Greek word for “authority” (exousia) in clear reference to husbands and wives. What does his bold statement mean in its biblical context, and what does it say about Christian mutuality in marriage and singleness today?

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The written word has long been a key player in advocacy. This has not changed, though the writing and publishing landscape has. This panel explores how egalitarian writers can effect change in a world saturated with content creators.

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In her book, Worthy: Finding Yourself in a World Expecting Someone Else, Melanie Springer Mock critiques the Christian culture which labels people and puts them into boxes. She then affirms God’s heart for every individual by emphasizing how much he loves them, regardless of what the world might think. She shares many experiences from her own life, both painful and positive, that helped challenge her thinking.

 

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The patriarchal hierarchy imbedded in Confucianism breaks the original design of harmony through filial piety and results in male dominance. This oppressive tendency is in dire need of the healing power of the gospel seen in women’s role in New Testament household codes.

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Sadly, those who cite Paul as an opponent of women's equality overlook the many examples of women leaders building the church beside the apostle. This workshop will show how 1 Timothy 2:11-15 and 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 are eddies off the stream of Paul’s egalitarian teachings and practices.

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The Gospel of John contains some unique and well-known stories about women. Two features distinguish women in John. 1) they serve in the key Johannine role as witnesses 2) they are the recipients of some of Jesus' most important self-disclosures.

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Women in the Church is a dangerous book which should not have been published because, while it appears to be scholarly, it actually teems with historical and theological errors and also emotional subjectivity. Alan G. Padgett has provided a critical rebuttal to Women in the Church in the Winter 1997 issue of Priscilla Papers

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