Welcome to CBE’s Library

image

A slam poem from the perspective of Sarah and Angelina Grimké.

KEEP READING
image

Crack the book that 
Re-rewrites history 
And grow new eyes to 
Legal injustice

As a girl I watched 
Color decide 
The lines between human and not 
Hit me 
Like the whip he used on your back 
Your blood flowed and your screams 
Choked my sense 
Of humanity 
Like a millstone 
Around my neck 
Growing heavier 
With each black face 
Pushed to the dirt

They said you weren’t
Allowed to know 
What letters meant 
On a page

KEEP READING
image

A womb, the currency of the day. Trade. Hagar’s womb: tilled soil. Gentile, slave, used and thrown away.

KEEP READING

Without expression, endurance cannot be shared.

KEEP READING

Oral tradition is important for an egalitarian understanding of the Bible—its origins, development, nature, and relevance—because women were among the key players in this stage of the Bible’s development.

KEEP READING
image

Just open a door. Even a small door. They will breach the surface like whales. They will walk with you on the waters. 
They will believe in the storm and the Storm Master. They will share His faith and yours. 

KEEP READING

"These are the Days of Rebekah" was first published on Stephen Holmes' blog, Shored Fragments, and is a parody of the song, “Days of Elijah.”

KEEP READING
image

I hear You cry, "I thirst," / and I cry tears I would gladly share / with Your cracked lips. / It is drier than any desert / to hear my Wellspring say, "I thirst."

KEEP READING
image

This story, from the point of view of a young girl, is about the collective responsibility of the church—male and female alike—to examine the type of environment we create not only through our theological stances, but also through our daily actions and interactions, so that we may make the church a safe and healthy place for girls and women.

KEEP READING