Welcome to CBE’s Library

Jesus’s encounter with the Syrophoenician woman of Mark 7 changed the minds of the first disciples and has the power to change modern minds as well.

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Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Susanna plus other women "provided for them out of their resources."  The Greek word translated as resources can mean property, possessions, resources, or means. These women financially supported Jesus and his ministry from their own finances.

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Galatians 3-4 teaches that we must read the Word of God with the barrier-removing Wind of God.

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The story of Ruth is filled with drama; there’s tragedy and triumph, loss and gain, and of course, romance. But this true love is inspired by the source of love, the very heart of God.

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May the faith of Mary, the apostle to the apostles, inspire in us a faithful vigilance in our isolation. We will meet and celebrate our risen Lord on Easter beyond the tomb.

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Gifts and callings are hand-selected by God, for you, to bless his church and impact the world around you. Yet sometimes, even with this knowledge, we can experience a spirit of fear regarding what God has called us to do.

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I remember the women—Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome—who discovered the empty tomb while delivering spices to Jesus’ grave (Mark 16:1-8). And the fact that Jesus first revealed himself to Mary, a woman, was constantly emphasized my wonderful mom.

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This sermon on Mary and Martha in Luke 10 argues that the problem is neither Martha’s housework nor Mary’s sitting at the feet of Jesus. The problem is judgment, which should be replaced with celebration of the gifts of others, even when those gifts differ from our own.

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Like Mary of Luke 10, our identity in Christ is not primarily as females or males but as faithful disciples.

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Christian tradition is sometimes remarkable for the liberties it takes with the reputations of its saints, and in this regard no example springs so readily to mind as that of Mary Magdalene. Tradition has had its field day with the reputation of this once deeply troubled woman. 

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