Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

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Was C. S. Lewis a misogynist? The answer depends on which point in his life you choose to examine. Until fairly late in life, Lewis’ view of gender relations was more influenced by his attraction to classical Greek philosophy, Pagan myth and Jungian psychology than by ‘mere’ Christianity. However, with his late acquaintance and marriage to the gifted American writer Joy Davidman, this began to change, as can be seen in his last (but least-read) works, The Discarded ImageTill We Have Faces, and A Grief Observed.

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There is no question that sexism and patriarchy play a role in interpreting the Bible, but few scholars are willing to admit that they are guilty of such practice. In this lecture, Dr. Hübner outlines vivid examples of when biblical exegesis goes south because of an agenda to discriminate against women and maintain male dominance. 

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This passage is used as a key building block in theologies portraying gender hierarchy as God’s will. This is while the exegetes offer very contradictory interpretations of the text, typically concluding that Paul was not very logical in his argumentation or alternatively parts of the challenging text are simply ignored. In this workshop, an interpretation is presented that assumes that Paul is logical in his argumentation.

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This workshop defines various types of feminism and analyzes their similarities and differences.

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Some areas of sexual violence have been perpetuated by cultural practices like wife inheritance (a male relative inheriting his kinsman’s wife after he dies). While on the surface the church seemed to challenge cultural practices, this has not been the case with practices that have been sexual and which largely affect women. Wife inheritance and gender prejudice is a major contributing factor to the spread of HIV and AIDS.

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What do Gen. 2:24-25 and Eph. 5: 21-33 have in common? When rightly understood, they both provide an almost formula-like description for a pleasurable, loving, faithful marriage of oneness. And both passages are built on equality and mutuality. Modern science teaches what the writers of Genesis and Ephesians could not have known.

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Lecture from 2016 international conference "Truth Be Told" in Johannesburg, South Africa.

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The book of Galatians reminds us we are called to be free, and to use that freedom to serve in love. 

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