Welcome to CBE’s Library

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This article maintains that the interpolation hypothesis sets a dangerous precedent for textual scholars who evaluate manuscripts.

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Keynote speakers Andrew Bartlett, Steve Holmes, and Lucy Peppiatt consider the spiritual and social consequences of theological patriarchy.

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Charles Read moderates a discussion with 2021 conference speakers Natalie Collins, Sean Callaghan, and Pontsho Segwai.

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Amanda Jackson (director of the Women’s Commission of the World Evangelical Alliance) leads a hopeful discussion with CBE 2021 international conference speakers on the impact of patriarchy in Irish churches and the barriers that women face.

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This article will consider how the coming of the kingdom of God provides “an alternative ordering of society” regarding women in community and leadership

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Evangelical women face a myriad of messages related to pastoral and teaching roles in the church and academy. Some evangelical churches open their doors to women leaders while others reject the ordination of women and endorse explicitly hierarchical models of gender relations, both in marriage relationships and also in church and church-focused institutional hierarchies. Others even extend male authority to secular arenas, excluding women from exercising leadership or authority over men that is direct and/or personal.

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First Corinthians presents Christian women with a time to speak, not a time to be silent.

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A study of curricula across 15 evangelical seminaries and of material from the Evangelical Theological Society reveals an almost total absence of women's history, meaning male leaders can rise to high levels while never being exposed to the countless ways women have impacted history and theology.

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"Partners," as the term is used in this statement, means more than aides or helpers who give assistance from the sidelines. The emphasis is communion, a unity of purpose that links hands and hearts as full members of the team. It stresses full participation, sharing in both the risks and the benefits of the enterprise: "giving and receiving" (Philippians 4:15). It portrays an enduring alliance as long-term colleagues rather than a casual short walk together.

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