Welcome to CBE’s Library

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This lecture covers an array of exegetical views expressed by Christian commentators of the ancient, medieval, and Reformation eras, and how their perspectives and concerns can be surprisingly similar to the concerns of feminist and womanist critics today.

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This lecture begins with the identification of the topics of gender and justice. Johnson then examines the challenge of looking at justice issues in ancient societies from the contemporary perspective.

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1 Timothy 2:8-15 is the primary verse that has been used to exclude women from teaching and leadership in the church. However, a careful examination of the passage in its context shows that it is most likely addressing false teaching and myths about marriage and childbirth that were spreading from house to house. As in 1 Corinthians 11:34, Paul wants women to be taught at home, as he corrects behavior and content, and answers a central concern of all women historically: How do we deal with maternal mortality?

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In this lecture, Hadadd asks: what does the church imply about women's ontology. She explains the three most common views about women, ontology, and authority in the church today before explaining the meaning of ontology. Finally, she traces the church's view of women, ontology, and authority throughout the years, from the early church to the 1900s.

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Ignorance of the doctrine of the Trinity is endemic in the church. Karl Barth initiated a change, at least for theologians. Now theologians agree that the doctrine of the Trinity is the foundational Christian doctrine. We Christians on the basis of Scripture believe that God is one yet three co-equal "persons" (not individuals). Moreover, the divine three work as one (being and function are two sides of one coin). Thus, according to historic orthodoxy and modern theology, the Trinity is inherently "anti-subordinationist."

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