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Welcome to CBE’s Library

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A Church Called Tov, co-written by Scot McKnight and his daughter Laura Barringer, addresses the importance of creating and sustaining a good (Hebrew tov) church culture.

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Was C. S. Lewis a misogynist? The answer depends on which point in his life you choose to examine. Until fairly late in life, Lewis’ view of gender relations was more influenced by his attraction to classical Greek philosophy, Pagan myth and Jungian psychology than by ‘mere’ Christianity. However, with his late acquaintance and marriage to the gifted American writer Joy Davidman, this began to change, as can be seen in his last (but least-read) works, The Discarded Image, Till We Have Faces, and A Grief Observed.

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This workshop examines the impact of church responses to victims of family violence and explores the role Christians can serve in breaking patterns of silence and biblical misinterpretations that contribute to continuing abuse and vulnerability.

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This workshop compares the American woman's experience of equality to the experience of displaced women such as refugees, immigrants, and victims of trafficking, and shows how we can advocate for them.

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This responsible analysis of Africa's presence in the Bible should be must reading for all thinking Christians who want to deepen their knowledge of the ethnic equality of Christians throughout the ages and in particular the true presence of Africans in our sacred Scripture.

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Participants will learn more about what it is like to be made in the image of God as a black woman in a society and Christian context that refuses to acknowledge that the imago Dei resides in her.

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Alan Johnson's work on 1 Corinthians is particularly engaging. His reference notes and bibliography provide an entry into further study if desired, all while maintaining an appealing readable style. He deftly bridges the two horizons of the Greco-Roman culture and American culture.

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Ron Clark offers a passionate and personally informed response to the issue of male-to-female violence. Drawing on his pastoral care efforts and experience of working with a variety of couples coming out of violent relationships, a reader can tell that he deeply cares about the issue at hand and that his personal reflections are well thought out. Overall, this book is easily accessible to a lay audience but may not be for those expecting rigorous theological exegesis or expansive social science research.

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An extremely well-written account of the author’s experience of living with an abusive husband who appeared to others as the epitome of a fine Christian gentleman . . . This heartfelt account is practical yet not clinical and without a trace of bitterness. How Marjorie recovered from this ordeal of many years will be of great encouragement to those who need courage while recognizing what is happening to them and taking steps towards full spiritual and emotional health.

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 In Beyond Abuse, readers who know of or who endeavor to care for those who experience domestic violence receive essential information as well as deeper insight into family abuse and what our more effective, healing response should be for both victims and perpetrators. The authors exhort the Christian reader to gain knowledge, and they provide the kind of redemptive guidance to abused women one usually has to seek from the secular community. Given the common occurrence of family violence and the resulting systemic problems that pervade our communities, Beyond Abuse is a must-read.

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