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This issue of Priscilla Papers is a celebration of its ten-year anniversary. It is a compilation consisting of articles from the first ten years of the journal. 

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If we broaden our scope to a global and centuries-long view, it becomes clear that the church’s primary source of biblical interpretation and application has been preaching.

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The theme of this issue of Priscilla Papers is Bible Translation. We featured this same theme four years ago, in the spring of 2015, but it is an important topic and worthy of considerable attention.
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Priscilla Papers is created by and for people with a broad range of gifts, professions, callings, and interests. Together, we are advancing evangelical gender egalitarianism.

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Please know that each issue of Priscilla Papers is a team effort. In addition to CBE staff both female and male, our team of peer reviewers consists of six women and five men. Women influence every item we publish.

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Academic

All of the articles in this issue were presented at conferences, and it also includes two book reviews.

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Priscilla Papers will recall John MacArthur’s October 2019 “go home” comment directed against Beth Moore. The responses abound—online, from the pulpit, and elsewhere.

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2017 is CBE International’s thirtieth anniversary and is being celebrated as a “Year of Jubilee.” This expanded issue of Priscilla Papers functions as part of this Jubilee celebration. 

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Someone ought to count the women of the Bible. More to the point, someone ought to count them accurately. I mention this because a quick Internet search reveals significant disparity in the various numbers people give for the women in the Bible. I should not criticize, however, for several difficulties make such counting an impossible task.

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Genesis 29:25 is one of the Bible’s more startling verses: “When morning came, there was Leah!” (NIV). Have you ever wondered how Jacob could not know—for the better part of a day and all of a night—that he had married Leah instead of Rachel? Surely several factors were at work, and just as surely one factor was Leah’s veil. This unusual event prompts my thinking: Much like the literal veiling of Leah caused her to be obscured and overlooked, the figurative veiling of many other biblical women sometimes hides them from our view.

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