Welcome to CBE’s Library

Some of us come from traditions where you don’t ask questions of the text. If you ask questions, that means you are questioning God, and that’s not allowed. I want to expose you to the two typical ways this passage has been understood.

KEEP READING
image

We need to pay attention to how we speak about female biblical characters. Are we affirming their personhood? Or are we communicating that they are extensions or property of men?

KEEP READING

The marriage guidance in Ephesians 5, rather than subjecting wives, is aimed at bringing the freedom of true Christian community into our homes.

KEEP READING

This Litany of Mutuality celebrates the equal creation of men and women in the image of God, and with equal giftedness and purpose for carrying out kingdom work.

KEEP READING

I offer here a history of preaching rhetoric with the hope of encouraging women whose calling is the pulpit. We will explore how women have proven their preaching authority and constructed their sermons across time.

KEEP READING

First Corinthians presents Christian women with a time to speak, not a time to be silent.

KEEP READING
image

I recently heard a sermon delivered by Dr. Peter T. Vogt, a professor of Old Testament at Bethel Seminary in Saint Paul, MN. In it, he shared some insights about the story of Naomi and Ruth. With his permission, I have summarized some of them here.

KEEP READING
image

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, I came to the tomb. I came alone in that time before dawn, when fear and doubt get the best of us, and when God seems farthest away. 

KEEP READING

How did Mary enter the popular imagination as the femme fatale with a checkered past, made demure and modest by her encounter with Christ? The answer is complicated, but it has much to do with the erasure of other women.

KEEP READING

Like Mary the mother of Jesus, Christian men and women are called to bring Christ to the world.

KEEP READING