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Welcome to CBE’s Library

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Who was Artemis Ephesia at the time of the earliest Christians, and what, if any, ramifications are there for how we understand 1 Timothy?

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This workshop defines different types of femenism and analyses the similarities and differences. 

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This workshop defines various types of feminism and analyzes their similarities and differences.

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When rightly understood, Gen. 2:24-25 and Eph. 5: 21-33 provide an almost formula-like description for a pleasurable, loving, faithful marriage of oneness built on equality and mutuality. Modern science teaches what the writers of Genesis and Ephesians could not have known.

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Using a theological interpretative approach, this workshop provides evidence of a typological relationship between Eve and Christ and discusses some of the implications for our understanding of human power and identity.

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While we should be cautious in our society of affairs, divorce, and casual sex, the time has come to look beyond our societal issues and ask whether that fear and suspicion among brothers and sisters is all we can hope for in the family of Christ. 

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1 Timothy 2:8-15 is the primary verse that has been used to exclude women from teaching and leadership in the church. However, a careful examination of the passage in its context shows that it is most likely addressing false teaching and myths about marriage and childbirth that were spreading from house to house. As in 1 Corinthians 11:34, Paul wants women to be taught at home, as he corrects behavior and content, and answers a central concern of all women historically: How do we deal with maternal mortality?

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Paul’s instructions in 1 Timothy that women are to dress modestly, learn silently, and find salvation in childbearing shape Christian identities and activities, but are routinely misread and misapplied. To make sense and good use of the instructions, a reader must consider the design and provenance of Paul’s letter.

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