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Welcome to CBE’s Library

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Christian history is full of remarkable women. Here we highlight women in the Old Testament, New Testament, and in mission since the early days of the church to the twenty-first century.

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There is a cloud of women witnesses who have gone before us and who are surely a great encouragement in our faith. Unfortunately, even our own seminaries overlook and misconstrue them.

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The First Nations Version is a phenomenal work. It is poetic, beautiful, and striking time and again. It captures the feel of hearing God's word spoken, and it corrects some mistakes other translations make.

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Sin is multidimensional in meaning, and both submission and self-esteem have both positive and negative aspects. I suggest that a theological examination of these concepts, in dialogue with psychology, can add a valuable dimension to current discussions on gender equality.

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The third edition of this groundbreaking work brings together scholars firmly committed to the authority of Scripture to explore historical, biblical, theological, cultural, and practical aspects of this discussion.

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By paying attention to the context and specific word usage of 1 Corinthians 14, it becomes clear that Paul was not asking anyone—tongues-speakers, prophets, or women—to be quiet permanently.

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When translators choose to use “whore” throughout Ezekiel 16, they let readers think it’s okay to use words with inescapably derogatory connotations. And the true focus of the passage—apostasy—gets lost.

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The ESV translation of Ephesians 4:13 only creates confusion in a complementarian setting. It causes some women to question whether they can become mature Christians to the extent that men can. And that’s not okay.

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We stand united in Christ to proclaim women’s dignity and purpose through accurate Bible translations, remembering that dehumanizing ideas about people lead to dehumanizing actions.

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The FNV is a dynamic equivalence translation that captures the simplicity, clarity, and beauty of Native storytellers in English, while remaining faithful to the original language of the New Testament. Whether you are Native or not, you will experience the Scriptures in a fresh and new way.

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