Welcome to CBE’s Library

Jamie Janosz, in her clearly written and carefully interpreted profile of eight nineteenth- and twentieth-century female Christians, explores the triumphs and hardships of these women.

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Paula Gooder presents an imaginative telling of the life and ministry of Phoebe. She states that her purpose in writing this story is not simply to provide an entertaining novel, but also to inform readers of the reality behind the NT text.

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Women in Pentecostal and Charismatic Ministry: Informing a Dialogue on Gender, Church and Ministry invites the reader to understand the Pentecostal/charismatic (P/c) movement from the epistemological loci of eighteen female (and two male) academics and practitioners.

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Pure examines the harmful effects of evangelical Christianity's purity culture with particular emphasis on the long-lasting and outward-rippling effects of shame. Of particular interest to CBE's audience, the book details the ways in which purity culture cooperates with patriarchy and harms women. 

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As a whole, Feminist Thought is a thoroughly-researched and concise treatment of a notoriously controversial and complex subject. Readers have professors Tong and Botts to thank for their tireless work on this extremely helpful volume. I highly recommend Feminist Thought if for no other reason than to put the brakes on judgment regarding what “feminist” might mean in today’s highly fragmented and tribalistic culture.

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Mystics and Misfits contains encouragement to lean deeper into relationship with God, going beyond intellectual assent and rational belief, into profound transformation by his love.

 

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 I found this five-chapter account of a recent theological dispute absolutely riveting, even though I already knew how it would end! It is an extraordinary story, told by a major player in the drama.

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The Beguines were a Christian ministry originating among the women of the laity outside of those who took monastic vows and entered convents. The “Beguines” gained their identity from a Belgic root-word—beg—meaning to mumble or to speak without clarity. This term was used disparagingly by highly privileged men who were jealous of women who were able to live independently economically and hold positions of privilege. The Beguines represented a broad spectrum of women of differing backgrounds who gave their lives and means to help the destitute, the ill, the downtrodden, and the homeless. Laura Swan’s history of the Beguines is the first good complete treatment of the Beguines that this reviewer has ever seen.

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Mimi Haddad's forword to Paul Chilcote's The Methodist Defense of Women in Ministry.

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Chapters of the Heart is one of the first collections of feminist and egalitarian stories as told by a feminine Jewish voice. These true stories range in theme from birth to death, mourning to learning, and loss to the stillness of older years. 

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