Welcome to CBE’s Library

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The Book of Eden: Genesis 2–3 by Bruce C. E. Fleming (based on the work of Joy Fleming, PhD, PsyD), is an excellent addition to the field of biblical gender studies.

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Academic

The Gospel According to Eve is a valuable resource for any egalitarian to have in their library. I also recommend it as assigned reading as part of a larger treatment or course on the history of interpretation.

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Kelley Nikondeha serves up powerful insights from the stories of the women of Exodus, the stories of women who resisted historical and modern injustices, and her own experiences.

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What The Gospel According to Eve tells us is that throughout the entire history of the church, individuals have been fighting to show that female subordination cannot be supported by Scripture.

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The book lives up to its subtitle, A Provocative Guide. . . . Though it has some value, I do not recommend it without reservation, given her methods of interpretation noted above.

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In a faith centered on love and inclusion, are single people and their God-given gifts truly being welcomed in our churches? According to theologian Christina Hitchcock, definitely not. Instead, she argues, American evangelical churches suffer from a fear of single people. 

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In Breaking the Marriage Idol, Kutter Calloway describes how the modern church has become distracted by pagan norms for sexual expression and marriage, and why this contributes to our idealization of marriage and the marginalization of unmarried persons. Arguing that the church has bought in to the Hollywood notion that marriage is the antidote to sexual promiscuity, Callaway calls the church to provide new stories to refute this superficial formula. He offers vision for how the church can become a place where love for the other is the pinnacle, and both unmarried and married persons lead and follow side by side, representing the best expression of God's intent for his people.

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Jessica Johnson, an anthropologist with no religious affiliation, finds the ethos and orientation at Mars Hill as incarnating “biblical porn” (hence the title of her book).

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Mystics and Misfits contains encouragement to lean deeper into relationship with God, going beyond intellectual assent and rational belief, into profound transformation by his love.

 

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Overall, Shalom Sistas is a fun read. It’s not too heavy on theology, but not without it. It’s primarily story-based, but also teaches the reader the peacemaking way of life. It’s humorous, but the reader will sometimes find herself crying. At the end of the day, it’s worth taking the time to join Osheta Moore, and think about bringing shalom to all areas of our lives.

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