Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

Answering his title question in the affirmative, Giles forcefully argues that “headship teaching can encourage and legitimate domestic abuse and it must be abandoned if domestic abuse is to be effectively countered in our churches.”

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Marriage in the Middle is a collection of life vignettes and personal experiences that will resonate with every married couple. Greco encourages couples to face midlife with imagination and hope and offers transparency, intimacy, and insight for the journey.  

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Marriage in the Middle will inspire and encourage you to invest in your relationship with your spouse, enabling you both to thrive as you face the challenges and changes of this era together.

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I would not recommend this book to someone who is firmly egalitarian. If someone is just starting to examine gender assumptions in a complementarian environment, this book may be a potential resource.

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Academic

Andrew Bartlett’s Men and Women in Christ is a tremendously helpful contribution to the debate that rages in evangelicalism over the “roles” of women.

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Kevin Giles surveys available scientific information and notes the consensus that the most sure indicator of higher incidences of abuse is found in communities where men are privileged and expected to be in charge.

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Are you in a destructive marriage? One of emotional, physical, or verbal abuse? Infidelity? Neglect? If you need a Life-Saving Divorce, there is hope for you, your faith, and your kids!

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The debate concerning gender roles in the church and in marriage continues to divide Christians. Can the gap be bridged between complementarians and egalitarians? 

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In Breaking the Marriage Idol, Kutter Calloway describes how the modern church has become distracted by pagan norms for sexual expression and marriage, and why this contributes to our idealization of marriage and the marginalization of unmarried persons. Arguing that the church has bought in to the Hollywood notion that marriage is the antidote to sexual promiscuity, Callaway calls the church to provide new stories to refute this superficial formula. He offers vision for how the church can become a place where love for the other is the pinnacle, and both unmarried and married persons lead and follow side by side, representing the best expression of God's intent for his people.

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Kutter Callaway considers why marriage, which is a blessing from God, shouldn't be expected or required of all Christians. Through an examination of Scripture, cultural analysis, and personal accounts, he reflects on how our narratives have limited our understanding of marriage and obscured our view of the life-giving and kingdom-serving roles of single people in the church.

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