Welcome to CBE’s Library

A victim-advocate shares her own story of domestic abuse and how her church responded. She also gives tips for how churches can teach congregants to recognize gender-based abuse and release victims from their silence.

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CBE President Mimi Haddad urges us to be harmonizers and find unity as God’s family during this season of polarization and division. She shows how Jesus modeled this by including marginalized women.

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Ben Witherington III’s story of Priscilla provides extensive insight into the lives of the earliest Christian women.

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One woman’s story about experiencing sexual abuse and sexism in the #ChurchToo, and how learning about consent from Jesus can show us how to reclaim our God-given bodily agency and have healthy relationships.

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CBE book club members reflect on their journeys with Defiant through the many questions we considered and the next steps that flowed from reading this powerful book.

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Academic

The Gospel According to Eve is a valuable resource for any egalitarian to have in their library. I also recommend it as assigned reading as part of a larger treatment or course on the history of interpretation.

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Last week, we published the first part of our interview with Kelley Nikondeha, author of our summer book club pick. We continue the conversation today and hear more about mutuality, freedom, and how readers have responded. (Part 2)

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This summer we are reading Kelley Nikondeha’s latest book Defiant. Kelley graciously agreed to let us get to know her a little better and hear more about the book from her perspective. (Part 1)

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Kelley Nikondeha serves up powerful insights from the stories of the women of Exodus, the stories of women who resisted historical and modern injustices, and her own experiences.

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When people share their stories of harmful church teachings about gender roles, we’re accustomed to real horror stories of abuse. We also know that the problem is far more widespread, and it’s not always so overt.

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