Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

The story of Gideon helps us understand why there aren’t more women in ministry. When God called Gideon, he was reluctant and anxious and in hiding—and a mighty warrior.

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It’s time to stop telling and start showing complementarians that the Bible doesn’t give us one perfect picture of biblical womanhood. This year’s Halloween costume just might feature a bloody tent peg.

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By paying attention to the context and specific word usage of 1 Corinthians 14, it becomes clear that Paul was not asking anyone—tongues-speakers, prophets, or women—to be quiet permanently.

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The ESV translation of Ephesians 4:13 only creates confusion in a complementarian setting. It causes some women to question whether they can become mature Christians to the extent that men can. And that’s not okay.

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In a continuation of the second of several conversations sponsored by CBE and our 2021 Conference partners, Charles Read asked three conference speakers to consider how churches can better value women leaders.

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The story of one historical woman can offer a glimpse of how Christian expectations on women varied based on their race.

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A number of recent events and publications indicate a shift in wider evangelical Christian culture in favor of egalitarianism. But that doesn’t mean our work is done yet.  

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A 2021 study suggests that women who attend complementarian churches have poorer health than women who attend egalitarian churches. This article unpacks the study’s findings. 

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Wayne Grudem’s commitment to Scripture is to be commended, but his lack of serious engagement with key challenges undermines a work that has been over twenty years in the re-making. Those looking for an evangelical systematic theology that is up-to-date on recent theological and exegetical advances should look elsewhere.

 

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Answering his title question in the affirmative, Giles forcefully argues that “headship teaching can encourage and legitimate domestic abuse and it must be abandoned if domestic abuse is to be effectively countered in our churches.”

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