Welcome to CBE’s Library

Jesus’s encounter with the Syrophoenician woman of Mark 7 changed the minds of the first disciples and has the power to change modern minds as well.

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First Corinthians presents Christian women with a time to speak, not a time to be silent.

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Like Mary of Luke 10, our identity in Christ is not primarily as females or males but as faithful disciples.

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The marriage guidance in Ephesians 5, rather than subjecting wives, is aimed at bringing the freedom of true Christian community into our homes.

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Jamie Janosz, in her clearly written and carefully interpreted profile of eight nineteenth- and twentieth-century female Christians, explores the triumphs and hardships of these women.

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Academic

The Gospel According to Eve is a valuable resource for any egalitarian to have in their library. I also recommend it as assigned reading as part of a larger treatment or course on the history of interpretation.

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Dharamraj reads the Song of Songs intertextually with the prophetic texts; within a literary culture, texts grow out of a shared linguistic, aesthetic, and ideological substratum, and then influence the interpretation of each other when they are read together.

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The tradition of women raising the eucharistic cup is witnessed from the late 100s to the mid-500s, including evidence from the three oldest surviving iconographic artifacts that depict early Christians in real churches.

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This sermon on Mary and Martha in Luke 10 argues that the problem is neither Martha’s housework nor Mary’s sitting at the feet of Jesus. The problem is judgment, which should be replaced with celebration of the gifts of others, even when those gifts differ from our own.

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Erdel proposes a dramatically different way of understanding the typological divine-human relationship in Song of Songs: The female beloved is a type of God, and the male lover is the type of unfaithful Israel.

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