Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

audioimage

While many Christians today believe women were created to be submissive to men, history tells another story. Created as strong rescue for man (Genesis 2:18), women have served the church as martyrs, missionaries, teachers and leaders revealing the gospel in places men feared to go. This workshop will consider the pioneering leadership of women on every continent, from the early church to the modern era. 

Listen Now
audioimage

In this episode of “Conversing,” Mimi Haddad, president of CBE, discusses gender equality and women in leadership. She reflects with Dr. Labberton, president of Fuller Seminary, on the complex relationship between theology and real-life injustice, the social and economic benefits of women in leadership, and the pressing task of “dismantling theological patriarchy” in the church.

Listen Now
audioimage

Lecture from 2016 international conference "Truth Be Told" in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Listen Now
audioimage

Lecture from 2016 international conference "Truth Be Told" in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Listen Now
audioimage

Lecture from 2016 international conference "Truth Be Told" in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Listen Now
audioimage

The Gospel of John contains some unique and well-known stories about women. Two features distinguish women in John. 1) they serve in the key Johannine role as witnesses 2) they are the recipients of some of Jesus' most important self-disclosures.

Listen Now
audioimage

Explores the most prominent biblical, historical, and cultural arguments presented by both sides in the discussion around the ordination of women as pastors in Egypt.

Listen Now
audioimage

Jael's Lethal Weapon: Why Women Cannot be Sidelined in this Critical Hour

Listen Now
audioimage

Julia Kavanaugh, an Irish Roman Catholic, was a Victorian novelist and biographer. Her book "Women of Christianity" offers the earliest survey of women’s lives in the Christian tradition. This text refutes the frequent charge of trendiness of egalitarianism, as it was written 150 years ago. It confronts male-dominated history (“great events, dazzling actions”) as pagan and transcends the “wearisome similarity” often depicted in saints’ lives. Finally, her book invites connections with contemporary feminist texts.

Listen Now