Welcome to CBE’s Library

Jesus’s encounter with the Syrophoenician woman of Mark 7 changed the minds of the first disciples and has the power to change modern minds as well.

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First Corinthians presents Christian women with a time to speak, not a time to be silent.

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Like Mary of Luke 10, our identity in Christ is not primarily as females or males but as faithful disciples.

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The marriage guidance in Ephesians 5, rather than subjecting wives, is aimed at bringing the freedom of true Christian community into our homes.

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This sermon on Mary and Martha in Luke 10 argues that the problem is neither Martha’s housework nor Mary’s sitting at the feet of Jesus. The problem is judgment, which should be replaced with celebration of the gifts of others, even when those gifts differ from our own.

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Erdel proposes a dramatically different way of understanding the typological divine-human relationship in Song of Songs: The female beloved is a type of God, and the male lover is the type of unfaithful Israel.

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Having evaluated the literary and cultural context of Deut 22:28–29, it is clear that its primary sociological and theological intentions reflect three prominent patriarchal themes.

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Rather than focusing on a woman and her sin, the focus in this story is on a group of sinful, male, religious leaders who use their privilege to try to kill a woman to solidify their power.

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1 Cor 11:2–16 touches on questions of creation and the nature of God and has been influential not only in the role of men and women in worship, but more fundamentally in the relations of man and woman to one another and to God.

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Many evangelicals do not know how to read the very texts they claim establish their distinctive identity. Far from viewing the biblical texts too reverently typical evangelical approaches fail to respect the text enough.

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