Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

In the first of several conversations sponsored by CBE and our 2021 London Conference partners in the UK, CBE president Mimi Haddad asked three keynote speakers to consider the spiritual and social consequences of theological patriarchy

KEEP READING

A 2021 study suggests that women who attend complementarian churches have poorer health than women who attend egalitarian churches. This article unpacks the study’s findings. 

KEEP READING

Complementarian theology depends on distinct roles for women and men in marriage. This article explores how, in practice, these roles mean women and men are not equal, leaving women vulnerable to spiritual abuse by men.   

KEEP READING

A seminary student explores questions about God-given hierarchy between women and men, including what the New Testament teaches about power, domination, and status to affirm God’s intent for women’s equality with men.

KEEP READING

This author tells the story of how her pastor sexually harassed her and how the church’s complementarian structure worked to protect him and discredit her and other victims.

KEEP READING

An Evangelical Press Association award winning poem:  God gave me a rose, A delicate thing and beautiful, Trembling in the breath of God, Tearful in the showered rain.

KEEP READING

One man’s reflections on seeing men cry and our expectations for male emotions. This article also highlights how the church reinforces these unhealthy expectations and how gender equality could free men.

KEEP READING

Like Mary the Mother of Jesus, Christian men and women are called to bring Christ to the world.

KEEP READING

Speaking into current #MeToo and #ChurchToo conversations, this book shows that the body of Christ desperately needs to understand the forms power takes, how it is abused, and how to respond to abuses of power.
 

KEEP READING
Academic

This article considers strategies shared by Islamic and Christian feminists in exposing and upending biased historical and exegetical methodologies that further attitudes, laws, and social practices that marginalize and oppress women.

KEEP READING