Welcome to CBE’s Library

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CBE book club members reflect on their journeys with Defiant through the many questions we considered and the next steps that flowed from reading this powerful book.

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Last week, we published the first part of our interview with Kelley Nikondeha, author of our summer book club pick. We continue the conversation today and hear more about mutuality, freedom, and how readers have responded. (Part 2)

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This summer we are reading Kelley Nikondeha’s latest book Defiant. Kelley graciously agreed to let us get to know her a little better and hear more about the book from her perspective. (Part 1)

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Oral tradition is important for an egalitarian understanding of the Bible—its origins, development, nature, and relevance—because women were among the key players in this stage of the Bible’s development.

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Women's History Month is all about focusing on the ways women have been intregral players in history, whether we know about them or not. It's also a good time to stop and take note of our reading (or listening or watching) habits in terms of gender. Who are you reading regularly? Do you need to put some diversity in your to-read list?

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Are you a pastor or spiritual leader who wants to help and not hurt? Is your church ready to study the link between theology and domestic violence? Here are fifteen resources on domestic violence. 

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Are you new to egalitarianism or rethinking your assumptions and beliefs about gender roles, authority, feminism, and the Bible? Or do you know someone who is open to reexamining these issues?

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If you have time; you like to set lofty summer reading goals; and you’re egalitarian, here’s your 2018 dream list.

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Over the past forty years, the remarkable presence of women in Prov 1–9 has drawn an equally remarkable number of studies, a gift from the rise of feminism and women in the academy. The combination of these two forces brings attention to the once invisible women in the text, figures generally overlooked or ignored as males have read and interpreted the text for other males. Now, however, the text again gives birth to these marginalized figures, providing them with bodies, eyes, ears, hands, feet, and especially, mouths for speech. Of 256 verses in Prov 1–9, 132 specifically mention or speak about women and another seventeen verses either introduce these texts or draw conclusions from them; hence fifty-eight percent of Prov 1–9. Yet, ironically, all this attention to women comes because of the writer’s interest and concern for young men (1:4), with a secondary appeal to older, wise men (1:5). For the sages, it would seem that the way to a man’s heart is not through food, but through women. After all, the author seems to assume, what better way to engage the attention of a young man than by speaking about or describing women?

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Digging deeper into Prov 31:10–31 in context reveals it was never intended to be a how-to manual for becoming the perfect woman. In the context of Proverbs, this passage is the parting mnemonic incentivizing young men to pursue wisdom and marry wisely.

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