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Welcome to CBE’s Library

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The domineering masculinity of American culture and the American church creates a distinct insecurity in men. This insecurity so bleeds out that men feel they must make others—particularly women—small.

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The impact of machismo and how men can learn to recognize and leverage their male privilege to create space for women in the church, lifting their voices and history.

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Black woman, God calls you to MISSION because he dwells within you. You were created to Motivate, Inspire, Set the pace, provide Safe spaces, live and lead with Integrity, and always be Optimistic and Nurturing.

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Nonconformists reject the status quo—which can be good when it comes to the church and corporate world’s standards, but not when it comes to God’s plan.

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As women clergy and leaders, we understand the pressure to perform. Conform. Please. There is always someone in our ear, requesting this, looking for that, demanding change, suggesting alternatives.

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Gender stereotypes and cultural conditioning make healthy male-female relationships difficult. As parents, mentors, and other parental figures, it’s our responsibility to teach and model mutuality to the next generation.

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The oppression and disparate treatment of women in society intersects with manhood, yet men hesitate to talk about these issues in male-only settings. Discussions of manhood must also include discussions of womanhood.

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By paying attention to the context and specific word usage of 1 Corinthians 14, it becomes clear that Paul was not asking anyone—tongues-speakers, prophets, or women—to be quiet permanently.

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Hierarchical marriage roles often give husbands an inflated sense of power and importance, but also leave them overwhelmed and exhausted. Husbands end up carrying a burden God intends husbands and wives to share.

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When translators choose to use “whore” throughout Ezekiel 16, they let readers think it’s okay to use words with inescapably derogatory connotations. And the true focus of the passage—apostasy—gets lost.

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