Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

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Possibly half the shepherds in Jesus’ day were women, and probably half the shepherds of the world today, too, are women. I am one of them.

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Single. Female. Pastor. Three words that are hard to swallow for the general population, much less the Christian community. 

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Sisters in ministry, I hope you will take these words to heart as you continue in the good work to which God has called you. Let’s reclaim our time together!

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Female pastors are facing unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Wonder Woman Syndrome” leaves women feeling like they have to do everything perfectly. Here are some tips to help you cope.

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Recently, a friend of mine was asked why she chose to work, and not stay home full-time with her child, even though her husband makes enough money to support their family. The question is unsurprising given the ongoing pressure on Christian women to prioritize home and family over career and calling. It seems that Christian women are still expected to choose between the public and the private.

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In Threads of Wisdom, Caroline Mendez responds to a vacuum that exists for Christian women in business. There is little opportunity for them to engage with other Christian businesswomen about how to use their God-given abilities in the workplace while at the same time giving expression to their faith.

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Clearly there are complex reasons why women fail to answer or reluctantly answer God’s call to ministry. Those who do will very likely face a difficult road.

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When I was a little girl I dreamed of being many things. Never did I ever consider being a pastor or, even worse, a church planter.

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As more women are being called by God and qualified to minister in the body of Christ alongside men, both sexes must get their acts together. Their hearts — and minds — must be changed.

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Women in the Church is a dangerous book which should not have been published because, while it appears to be scholarly, it actually teems with historical and theological errors and also emotional subjectivity. Alan G. Padgett has provided a critical rebuttal to Women in the Church in the Winter 1997 issue of Priscilla Papers. I refer readers to his technical refutation of the key themes of Women in the Church. I will highlight other problems with the book and critique its basic tone.

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