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This article presents some of the findings of a qualitative case study of women academics at the 2014 ETS Annual Meeting. It was our goal to listen to the stories and perspectives of evangelical women academics specifically in the context of ETS, and to gain insights regarding how CBE—and others—could better support women at ETS. 

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Explores the most prominent biblical, historical, and cultural arguments presented by both sides in the discussion around the ordination of women as pastors in Egypt.

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The book of Galatians reminds us we are called to be free, and to use that freedom to serve in love. 

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Misreadings of NT passages are undoubtedly due to a combination of assumptions, traditions, and all kinds of post-biblical and sub-biblical attitudes that have crept in to Christianity. We need to change our understanding of what the Bible says about how men and women are to relate to one another within the church.

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Two leaders of a pre-ministerial initiative for college students reveal how their theology of male/female shared leadership shapes their and students visions for ministry. Drawing on theological insights from Genesis and personal experience, they offer a practical theology for ministry leaders serving in Gods image.

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Genesis 1:26–27 clearly teaches that both man and woman are created in God’s image. Women and men are therefore fully equal as human beings. There are other important Scripture texts that imply women’s fundamental equality. But this passage indicates the root of that equality.

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One aspect in the life of the eighteenth-century Moravian Church has gone almost unnoticed, even among modern Moravians: the fact that women shared many of the pastoral responsibilities within the church, wrote spiritual autobiographies, received ordination, and even engaged in preaching

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If God meant women to lead in religious functions, why were they forbidden the priesthood under the Old Covenant?” This question expresses one of many arguments used to limit the participation of women within the church. It is a reasonable question and deserves a thoughtful answer.

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