Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

In the Social Justice Handbook, I identified with the passion Cannon has for social justice and the burden she has for drawing others to engage in compassion and action to address the issues and causes of injustice and poverty. Cannon succeeds in connecting her readers to issues of social justice, providing them with resources to help them to engage their immediate spheres of influence as "change agents" on behalf of the least among us.

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Ursula King’s reader, Feminist Theology from the Third World brings together the diverse perspectives of women engaging in feminist theology, giving recognition and honor to the often absent or underrepresented voices of women of the Third World and women of color in the Unites States. 

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Grit and Grace is an empowering, thought-provoking, and eminently readable book. 

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Stan Goff’s Borderline: Reflections on War, Sex, and the Church offers a fresh, if controversial perspective on the relationship between the church, war, and patriarchy. Goff’s central argument is that war loving and women hating are ultimately two sides of the same coin, driven by the same fears that allow for the rationalization of conquest and colonization.

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Proverbs 21: 9 says that “It is better to live in a corner of the housetop than in a house shared with a contentious wife.”  While sitting on one’s rooftop is not technically a prescribed punishment for a woman’s belligerence, Rachel Held Evans decided that a minute of roof time per contentious remark of the previous month was an appropriate penance.  Because she is accused of making a mockery of the Bible with her new book, A Year of Biblical Womanhood: How a Liberated Woman Found Herself Sitting on Her Roof, Covering Her Head, and Calling Her Husband Master, one might think Evans would be the epitome of the contentious woman, but I, in fact, found the opposite to be true.  While undoubtedly bold, Evans is about as gracious as they come, and her book celebrates womanhood rather than promoting division.

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My advice: Buy this book. Read it slowly. Chew on its words. Digest its content. Let its truths tutor your mind, penetrate your soul, and motivate you toward embracing, modeling, and conveying a more humble, Christlike expression of power.

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In Love & War, the Eldredges attribute the "absurdity of marriage" to innate gender discrepancies. Men and women are so fundamentally different, they assert, that it is no wonder that few can make it work.

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Alan Johnson, emeritus professor of New Testament and Christian ethics at Wheaton College (Illinois), has put together autobiographical accounts of twenty-seven evangelical leaders, both men and women, from many denominations. 

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Daughters of Islam: Building Bridges with Muslim Women is a wonderfully relevant book for Christians who have little knowledge of Islam or the people who subscribe to it. This book helps readers peer into the hearts of Muslim women, to perceive what they feel and think, and to understand how they live.

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Lynn Cohick's extraordinarily detailed book shows us an accurate reconstruction of women's ways of life in the Greco-Roman world of the first century A.D. The book seems to be aimed toward academics and other well-informed readers . . . Cohick wishes to tell the story of average women, their life passages, opportunities, limits, joys, and sorrows. She investigates women as daughters, as mothers, as wives, as slaves, as businesspeople, as benefactors, both Jewish and Gentile, as well as those who became Christians

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