Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

My advice: Buy this book. Read it slowly. Chew on its words. Digest its content. Let its truths tutor your mind, penetrate your soul, and motivate you toward embracing, modeling, and conveying a more humble, Christlike expression of power.

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In 1994, 10 percent of Rwanda’s population was slaughtered in a mass genocide over a period of 100 days. In the aftermath, Rwandans struggled to secure food and water, find loved ones, and rebuild a sense of security. Into this chaos stepped the women of Rwanda, who defied tradition to take on leadership roles and recovery efforts while dealing with individual and collective trauma and grief. 

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Women As Global Leaders outlines the gaps in current research and points us in a clear direction for future study and consideration. While not overtly religious, this resource is a challenge to CBE readers to take equality to the next level and to consider what true leadership can look like, regardless of gender, on the international stage.

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It's not an exaggeration to say that misogyny is a matter of life and death. Our theology impacts women and men all around the world. Every woman is made in the image of God!

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 In Beyond Abuse, readers who know of or who endeavor to care for those who experience domestic violence receive essential information as well as deeper insight into family abuse and what our more effective, healing response should be for both victims and perpetrators. The authors exhort the Christian reader to gain knowledge, and they provide the kind of redemptive guidance to abused women one usually has to seek from the secular community. Given the common occurrence of family violence and the resulting systemic problems that pervade our communities, Beyond Abuse is a must-read.

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Ron Clark offers a passionate and personally informed response to the issue of male-to-female violence. Drawing on his pastoral care efforts and experience of working with a variety of couples coming out of violent relationships, a reader can tell that he deeply cares about the issue at hand and that his personal reflections are well thought out. Overall, this book is easily accessible to a lay audience but may not be for those expecting rigorous theological exegesis or expansive social science research.

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“When abuse strikes, there is no home.”

So say Catherine Clark Kroeger and Nancy Nason-Clark in their book, No Place for Abuse. This quote struck me, as I grew up in a fundamentalist church where mentioning some personal abuse brought blame to me and sympathy to my father. This book is refreshing in its directness as it addresses the ticklish issue of how churches have traditionally dealt with abuse.

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Responding to Abuse in Christian Homes: A Challenge to Churches and their Leaders represents the final book edited by Catherine Clark Kroeger, together with her colleagues Nancy Nason ­Clark and Barbara Fisher-Townsend. Similar to other publications by the late Dr. Kroeger, this book addresses the link between violence against Christian women by their (oftentimes) believing husbands and the incorrect theological presuppositions which enable the violence to persist. 

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Too often the patriarchy of Bible culture has been confused with the moral teachings of Scripture. This workshop will explore how Christians working to end slavery challenged power, dominance, and self-interest in interpreting Scripture so that the church might become more effective agents of reconciliation in the world. What might egalitarians today learn from the interpretative methods of the abolitionists in their work as agents of gender justice?

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Ideas Have Consequences: Justice Begins with a Consistent Reading of Scripture

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