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Welcome to CBE’s Library

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My advice: Buy this book. Read it slowly. Chew on its words. Digest its content. Let its truths tutor your mind, penetrate your soul, and motivate you toward embracing, modeling, and conveying a more humble, Christlike expression of power.

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The ”Real Men” workshop discusses the lies men believe, their challenges, and their role in promoting egalitarianism. 

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2015 "Becoming New" CBE International Conference

It's not an exaggeration to say that misogyny is a matter of life and death. Our theology impacts women and men all around the world. Every woman is made in the image of God!

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Women throughout history have been at the forefront of the holy resistance to violence and hatred and death.

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“The purpose of the stories about biblical mothers falls on literary and socially deaf ears unless they mean something to twenty-first-century mothers,” Stephanie Buckhanon Crowder writes in When Momma Speaks. This is the essence of Crowder’s mission: to forge a story connection between biblical mothers of color and modern African American mothers.

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Natalie Carnes’s Motherhood: A Confession is an invitation to deconstruction, reclamation, and renewal in Christ.

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 In Beyond Abuse, readers who know of or who endeavor to care for those who experience domestic violence receive essential information as well as deeper insight into family abuse and what our more effective, healing response should be for both victims and perpetrators. The authors exhort the Christian reader to gain knowledge, and they provide the kind of redemptive guidance to abused women one usually has to seek from the secular community. Given the common occurrence of family violence and the resulting systemic problems that pervade our communities, Beyond Abuse is a must-read.

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Ron Clark offers a passionate and personally informed response to the issue of male-to-female violence. Drawing on his pastoral care efforts and experience of working with a variety of couples coming out of violent relationships, a reader can tell that he deeply cares about the issue at hand and that his personal reflections are well thought out. Overall, this book is easily accessible to a lay audience but may not be for those expecting rigorous theological exegesis or expansive social science research.

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“When abuse strikes, there is no home.” So say Catherine Clark Kroeger and Nancy Nason-Clark in their book, No Place for Abuse. This quote struck me, as I grew up in a fundamentalist church where mentioning some personal abuse brought blame to me and sympathy to my father. This book is refreshing in its directness as it addresses the ticklish issue of how churches have traditionally dealt with abuse.

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