Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

Women in Pentecostal and Charismatic Ministry: Informing a Dialogue on Gender, Church and Ministry invites the reader to understand the Pentecostal/ charismatic (P/c) movement from the epistemological loci of eighteen female (and two male) academics and practitioners. The contributors are sympathetic to the P/c movement and bring to the volume theological and biblical scholarship alongside varying degrees of ministerial insight and experience

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Giles, a longtime egalitarian, establishes what the Bible actually teaches by critiquing biblical arguments for the permanent subordination of women; in other words, Giles critiques complementarian theology and methodology.

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I recommend highly the Zondervan TNIV Study Bible because it contains a gender-inclusive evangelical text with extensive notes and aids.

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Even though Köstenberger claims to supply the reader with the "facts" (16), and to employ a "listening hermeneutic" (119, 220, 229), and not elevate ideology over Scripture (119), claiming to have no "presupposed notions" (183), in reality what she does herself is analyze feminists' writings about Jesus through the theological framework of gender defined by the Council of Biblical Manhood and Womanhood (CBMW) (which she cites, 23, 179). In effect, she evaluates all writers on the extent they agree with the following presuppositions: "governing 1 and teaching roles within the church are restricted to men" (179) . . .

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Sarah Sumner writes an apologetic that is especially helpful to dissatisfied complementarians who do not want to see themselves as "feminists." She wants the Christian community to function as the family of God, where women are mothers in the church and men are fathers in the church, both fulfilling their design to usher in God's reign.

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In a time when wealth and prosperity are more welcomed than the cost of discipleship, Climbing the Dragon's Ladder is a timely historical novel. No greater identification can be made about the cost involved in persevering as a Christian than identifying with a martyr such as Perpetua. Andrea Lorenzo Molinari, president of Blessed Edmund Rice School for Pastoral Ministry and assistant professor of New Testament and early church history, has used the original account of The Martyrdom of Perpetua in combination with archaeological and historical information to expand upon and recreate a likely scenario for Perpetua's martyrdom. 

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Increasingly, one of the latest reactions to the evangelical gender debate among some younger Christian women is “I am neither complementarian nor egalitarian,” inviting the reply: So, then, what are you? And, why do you respond in this way?Michelle Lee-Barnewall, associate professor of biblical and theological studies at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University, gives voice to this relatively recent group.

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This is a stimulating monograph on a key text in New Testament Christology. Park fully justifies her claim that an ethic of submission is found in Philippians, even though the word is not used by Paul. She is right to see both soteriology and ethics at work in these passages. But her tendency to read a binary hierarchy into the God/Christ relationship in Philippians 2 undermines some of her expansive conclusions toward the end of the book. 

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Does God Make the Man? is a fascinating look at how evangelical and ecumenical men process the messages they hear about masculinity from religion and media. The authors organized focus groups and recorded hundreds of hours of conversations to see if religion is vital to developing masculine identity. They conclude that, although evangelical men may claim to learn gender roles from the Bible, the actual sources of this knowledge are media and culture. 

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Many of us have longed for a sane, nuanced conversation around differing viewpoints on gender issues in marriage. The Spencers and Tracys have given us that conversation in this fine book. 

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