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For Christians who believe in verbal inspiration, words matter when interpreting the Bible. To seriously study 1 Timothy 2, we must not ignore the precise words Paul used to talk about women.

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Is God strong, vigilant, and manly? Or compassionate, merciful, and motherly? What if it’s both? Let’s explore more deeply the implications of the compassion of God for how we understand femininity and motherhood.

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John McKinley gives an honest and insightful critique of complementarianism, calling for a “Gender Humility” approach.

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By paying attention to the context and specific word usage of 1 Corinthians 14, it becomes clear that Paul was not asking anyone—tongues-speakers, prophets, or women—to be quiet permanently.

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The ESV translation of Ephesians 4:13 only creates confusion in a complementarian setting. It causes some women to question whether they can become mature Christians to the extent that men can. And that’s not okay.

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We stand united in Christ to proclaim women’s dignity and purpose through accurate Bible translations, remembering that dehumanizing ideas about people lead to dehumanizing actions.

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The primary task when considering Paul's assertion, “the husband is the head of the wife,” should be discovering the meaning of this head-and-body metaphor, not arguing for an extended metaphorical sense of half of the metaphor—the single word, "head."

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This is the fourth blog in a series on Bible word studies for egalitarians. This entry explores whether words have gender and shows how the grammatical gender in Hebrew and Greek show up in Bible translation.

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This is the third in a series about Bible word studies and translation for egalitarians. This entry focuses on a particular instance of a word doesn’t contain all the meaning that the word can carry in 1 Timothy 2.

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How do we know what a word means? A linguist could spend a career answering this question, but here’s the simple answer: Words do not have meaning outside of context. It is the context that makes meaning.

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