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The issue of women’s ordination overshadows the unrestricted use of gifts in the church. Opportunities to use our gifts are still doled out based on sexist gender ideologies of what it means to be a woman or a man.

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Even as egalitarians, our conversations about abuse in the church are often laced with patriarchy, centering men as authoritative even though they are not the primary victim.

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What can anatomic pathology teach us about women’s equality? The importance of considering the bigger picture before becoming fixated on little details.

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Crisscrossing both testaments, gender balance looks at the Bible in a way clearly contained within the text itself. It tempers patriarchy. It offers solace to those wounded by misogyny. It invites study and comparison.

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Gender stereotypes and cultural conditioning make healthy male-female relationships difficult. As parents, mentors, and other parental figures, it’s our responsibility to teach and model mutuality to the next generation.

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Patriarchal beliefs in American evangelicalism regarding women and men’s roles are pervasive—even in egalitarian churches. This helps explain the exodus that begins when a woman enters a church as pastor.

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On the New Voices thread, hosts Blake and Erin speak with Dr. Stephanie Buckhanon Crowder about her book When Momma Speaks: The Bible and Motherhood from a Womanist Perspective.

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Jesus had female disciples, and there’s a reason they weren’t included in “The Twelve.” Hint: it wasn’t because Jesus didn’t approve of women as church leaders.

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In his response to a question posed by the Sadducees, Jesus said that those in the resurrection "neither marry nor are given in marriage." The reason women will not be "given in marriage" is that, in the resurrection, they will not be viewed as property.

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Amid the patriarchy of the ancient world, early Christianity had a particularly liberating and redemptive place for women, one significant enough to be mentioned by Christianity’s first major critic, the second-century philosopher Celsus.

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