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Barr's historical insights provide context for contemporary teachings about women's roles in the church and help move the conversation forward.

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This five-part lecture series explores the biblical, historical, and social precedent for women's shared leadership in the church, the home, and the world. Topics include Old and New Testament evidence of women's leadership, women's leadership in church history, understanding power dynamics, and working cross-culturally.

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A respected New Testament scholar examines the entire New Testament, arguing that women were not only valued as disciples but also given leadership roles, which has implications for the contemporary church.

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Christian feminists seek to find, listen to, and raise the voices of women and others' experiences through diverse means, in order to contribute to the spread of the gospel, redemption, and justice for all.

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William Witt argues that not only those in favor of, but also those opposed to, women’s ordination embrace new theological positions in response to cultural changes of the modern era.

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Keynote speakers Andrew Bartlett, Steve Holmes, and Lucy Peppiatt consider the spiritual and social consequences of theological patriarchy.

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In Women in a Patriarchal World Elaine Storkey focuses on the stories of women who faced a range of challenges and life-changing decisions.

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This book goes far beyond hot flashes and gets to the very heart of the midlife journey, helping women find their unique voice and speak their truth in an era of #MeToo and #ChurchToo.

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The debate concerning gender roles in the church and in marriage continues to divide Christians. Can the gap be bridged between complementarians and egalitarians? 

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Jessica Johnson examines how Mars Hill's congregants became entangled in processes of religious conviction. Johnson shows how they were affectively recruited into sexualized and militarized dynamics of power through the mobilization of what she calls "biblical porn"—the affective labor of communicating, promoting, and embodying Driscoll's teaching on biblical masculinity, femininity, and sexuality.

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